Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th World Nursing and Healthcare Conference Crowne Plaza, Heathrow, London, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ali H Mokdad

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, USA

Keynote: The global burden of disease: The status of 188 countries, 1990-2013

Time : 9.30 am: 10:00 am

Conference Series World Nursing Conference-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ali H Mokdad photo
Biography:

Ali Mokdad, PhD, is Director of Middle Eastern Initiatives and Professor of Global Health at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. He started his career at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990. He has published more than 300 articles and numerous reports and received several awards, including the Global Health Achievement Award for his work in Banda Aceh after the tsunami, the Department of Health and Human Services Honor Award for his work on flu monitoring, and the Shepard Award for outstanding scientific contribution to public health.

Abstract:

The Global Burden of Disease 2013 (GBD) is a systematic, scientific effort to quantify the comparative magnitude of health loss from all major diseases, injuries, and risk factors by age, sex, and population and over time for 188 countries from 1990 to present. It covers 306 diseases and injuries, 2,337 sequelae, and 76 risk factorsIn addition to the traditional health metrics such as disease and injury prevalence and incidence, death numbers and rates, GBD provides Years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) – count the number of years lost at each age compared to a reference life expectancy of 86 at birth, Years lived with disability (YLDs) –for a cause in an age-sex group equals the prevalence of the condition times the disability weight for that condition and Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) –are the sum of YLLs and YLDs and are an overall metric of the burden of disease. Global life expectancy for both sexes increased from 65.3 years in 1990, to 71.5 years in 2013, while the number of deaths increased from 47.5 million to 54.9 million over the same interval for women aged 25–39 years and older than 75 years and for men aged 20–49 years and 65 years and older. YLDs for both sexes increased from 537.6 million in 1990 to 764.8 million in 2013, while the age-standardized rate decreased from 114.87 to 110.31 per 1,000 people between 1990 and 2013. At the global level, the most important contributors to the overall burden were high blood pressure, smoking, high blood glucose, and diet. Strategies and policies to improve the health of populations should be guided by the comparative importance of health loss arising from exposure to major risk factors, whatever their position in the causal chain.

Conference Series World Nursing Conference-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Helen Riess photo
Biography:

Helen Riess, M.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She directs the Empathy and Relational Science Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her research team conducts translational research utilizing the neuroscience of emotions. The effectiveness of Dr. Riess’s empathy education approach has been demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial. Dr. Riess has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and is an internationally recognized speaker and researcher. Her Empathy TEDx talk has been viewed by over 100,000 viewers. Her empathy training curricula are implemented internationally in healthcare. She is Chief Scientific Officer of Empathetics, Inc, providing web-based empathy training solutions.

Abstract:

\r\n The decline in empathy in healthcare has reached global proportions (Berwick Report, 2013) and highlights the need for evidence-based interventions. Ninety percent of nurses, physicians and hospital administrators endorsed the need for institutional empathy training in a recent Schwartz Center Survey. Professional empathy is correlated with patient safety, patient satisfaction, better health outcomes, and clinician wellbeing. Research shows that empathy for patients declines throughout medical training with increasing burnout in medical professionals. implicating up to 60% of nurses in the US. Patients are demanding humanistic care which is paramount to restoring the public’s trust in the medical profession. This presentation will highlight novel empathy research that demonstrates that empathy can be taught with sustainable behavior changes and our recent meta-analysis that demonstrated that relationship factors improved health outcomes such as obesity, asthma, diabetes, hypertension, and pulmonary infections. These interventions are closely tied to cost reduction.\r\nA multi-centered randomized controlled trial was conducted at a large general hospital to determine whether a novel neuroscience-based empathy training could improve clinician empathy at the level of patient perception. The training group showed significant improvement in patient ratings of empathy (p=.02). A brief series of three training sessions significantly improved clinicians’ empathic and relational skills as rated by their patients. The training has been translated into a web-based format for global accessibility. With patients deserving humanistic care from their healthcare institutions, we present a solution that offers a step towards systemic changes to improving compassionate care.

Keynote Forum

Geetha Jayaram

Johns Hopkins University, USA

Keynote: She for all: Engaging women leaders to advance community and global mental health in low-resource settings

Time : 10:00am to 10:30am

Conference Series World Nursing Conference-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Geetha Jayaram photo
Biography:

Dr. Jayaram is a senior faculty member in the Johns Hopkins Department of Psychiatry. She is a community psychiatrist by training. She was Physician Advisor for the Department for 21 years and directs an inpatient service for acutely psychiatrically ill patients. She has held and continues to hold leadership positions nationally and internationally, has published over a 100 papers, abstracts, books and teaching modules. She has won several national and international awards for teaching and administrative leadership, as well as clinical research. Her long term humanitarian mental health initiative called Maanasi can be viewed at www.ProjectMaanasi.org.

Abstract:

One World Health Organization’s mental health plan objective is to provide comprehensive, integrated and responsive mental health and social care services in community based settings. Today, around 70% of India is rural, with limited health care facilities and medical resources; 35% of India’s population is under age 15; 28% of the rural population is in the lowest wealth quintile, 41% of women aged 15–49 are uneducated. One third of women in rural India experience physical or sexual violence during their lives, and 70% of these affected women suffer from severe mental illness. Common mental disorders among women in rural India are associated with low education, poverty, lack of access to running water in the home and hunger. This may lead to suicide, triggered by interpersonal problems, domestic disputes, and financial stress. Women outnumber men in completed suicides. The awareness of lack of treatment is increasing among women in rural India. Mental disorders are highly prevalent, have greater effects on role functioning than other chronic physical illnesses. Project Maanasi is a solution to educate, train and treat women and children in villages in Southern India through humanitarian grants and services. Key elements of the program are: integration with primary care; use of village female community health workers; patient, family, physician and nursing education and training via culturally congruent means.

  • Nursing education
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Amicucci’s areas of expertise include Med Surg/Telemetry, Public Health & Community nursing, as well as nursing administration. She has been certified as a nurse educator with the National League for Nursing since 2007 and has been teaching nursing full time for the past 11 years. She has taught as a clinical adjunct in both RN to BSN completion and Accelerated BSN programs. She is currently an Associate Professor and is also completing her post graduate FNP clinical and coursework to augment her teaching and clinical practice. Her research interests in nursing education include clinical education and evaluation

Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this research presentation is to share the process and findings of a phenomenological study which was conducted to understand the experience of clinical grading for clinical nursing faculty in pre-licensure nursing programs. This understanding has the potential to improve clinical grading practices including preparation of faculty for the role, and administrative support of faculty. Background: The role of the clinical nursing faculty is laden with responsibility and possible effects on patient safety and professional practice. Clinical grading is one approach to assure that future nurses have the knowledge and skills to provide safe patient care. Methods: Through the use of a qualitative phenomenological method, full-time nursing faculty were recruited to obtain a purposive sample. Outcomes: Findings from this study revealed five essential themes. These essential themes were collated to form a textual interpretive statement which illuminated the meaning of the experience of clinical grading for the participants. Significance & Implications: Implications for improvements in nursing education include faculty considerations, improvement in clinical objectives and evaluation tools, and administrative support. The translation of this research to practice can result in changes in educational policies. Improvements in clinical nursing education grading practices will result in better performance by new graduate nurses and have a positive effect on safe patient care.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Kathleen Becker received her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Chatham University and is a Distinguished Practitioner and Fellow of the National Academies of Practice. Dr Becker is the Track Coordinator for the Adult-Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program at The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Dr Becker’s scholarship focuses development and testing of curricula on interdisciplinary primary care practice and high functioning teams. She has published more than 25 papers in peer reviewed journals as well as multiple book chapters.

Abstract:

Interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice is a core competency in the education of health professionals in the United States and Europe. Defined as learners from “two or more professions learning with, from, and about each other to improve collaboration and quality of care ”. 1 IPE integrates the understanding of different health care providers’ roles and educational culture with clinical care experiences. IPE is formative, process driven and experiential. Debriefing, or facilitated reflection and discussion is an integral aspect of experiential education and is used extensively in interprofessional education3. Debriefing is the time that follows a simulated or actual clinical experience when the student and preceptor revisit the encounter reflectively and learn from the events that occurred. Debriefing can develop learners’ critical thinking, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills, potentially establishing a foundation for lifelong learning and effective interprofessional, collaborative practice. In this presentation we describe a novel application and synthesis of two complementary models of debriefing, the 3D Model 2 and System Centered Therapy3. This newly conceptualized model provides a more robust approach to the debriefing encounter and offered the opportunity to address learner anxiety and group dynamics. Twenty-six faculty representing four professions; nursing, medicine, pharmacy and spiritual care utilized this debriefing approach in a longitudinal IPE curriculum. Debriefing and facilitated reflection occurred in small interprofessional student groups (nurse practitioner, pharmacy and pastoral care trainees) after 3 separate learning experiences; a discovery and team building exercise, a standardized patient simulation, and home visits. Qualitative and quantitative data that describes faculty experiences in applying the model and evaluating its utility with interprofessional groups of students will be described as will recommendations for future applications

Lynn B Clutter

The University of Tulsa College of Health Sciences, USA

Title: Active learning improves nursing student clinical performance
Speaker
Biography:

In order to assess outcomes of the use of active learning strategies, 5 groups of nursing students (n=56) across three bachelor degree levels (years 2-4) in Macao demonstrated higher clinical evaluation and higher appraisals in verbal and written comments than students without the intervention. Students in practicum experiences in medical, surgical, critical care and palliative care in hospital and community settings were encouraged to actively extend their own skill acquisition and demonstrate learning while in clinical experiences. Active behaviors included asking questions, seeking support, repeating skills, seeking more clinical opportunities, and responding to patient questions about their condition or care. Study findings suggest that teaching principles of active learning improves student clinical performance. Skill learning, skill practice and provision of nursing care appear to increase when active learners seek out clinical learning opportunities. An active learning model in nursing education is recommended and may improve student performance in Macao. Findings were specific to Macao bachelor degree nursing students; however concepts may be generalizable to others globally. Nursing students who engage in active learning demonstrate acquisition of knowledge, theory and skills used in clinical practice with resultant improved preceptor evaluations of performance. Students were more self-directed, confident and pleased with outcomes. Preceptors enjoyed mentoring active-learning students. Barriers to active learning exist and can be effectively addressed by educators. Features of active learning models, ways of encouraging active learning, and clinical applications fostering student engagement are aspects addressed in the oral presentation. Clinical learning is a major means of advancing nursing education.

Abstract:

Lynn B Clutter works extensively in nursing care of the family. She is faculty in the university BSN program where she enjoys teaching and mentoring students. She is a Lactation Consultant at Saint Francis Hospital. Teaching and clinical encompass areas of pediatrics, community health, genetics, ethics and research. Qualitative and quantitative research include publication topics of test anxiety & cortisol levels, nursing student clinical experiences, attachment, children's pain, spiritual care, adolescent parenting, unintended pregnancy and adoption. She serves as Vice President of the Wong-Baker FACES Foundation Board, is a leader in professional organizations and has practiced as a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

Speaker
Biography:

Julie M Pullen has completed DNP from Concordia University, Wisconsin (USA) in 2014. She has practiced full-time as a Family Nurse Practitioner before completing a Post-master’s Certification in Geriatrics. She is a certified Geriatric Nurse Practitioner with more than 10 years of experience and currently teaches full-time. Her doctoral project, focusing on suicide prevention in long-term care was recently accepted for publication in a geriatric journal. She currently serves on a community suicide prevention coalition, the education committee of American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-Montana chapter and educates Montana State University faculty and staff in suicide prevention gatekeeper training.

Abstract:

Internationally, little is known of educational content focused on suicide prevention in undergraduate nursing curricula. Through 2014, there were no known published research studies on implementation of suicide prevention training in a BSN curriculum, despite the need for such instruction as cited by various international healthcare and nursing initiatives. The aim of this multi-method study was to describe senior baccalaureate students’ responses to an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer which was implemented in a required course. Data were collected utilizing a pre & post-survey questionnaire administered to 150 students in four classes of a psychiatric nursing course from 2012 through 2014. The quantitative results were statistically significant (p<0.000) indicating an overall positive rating of the training. From the qualitative data, the main theme was ‘becoming capable intervening with persons at risk for suicide’. Students responded favorably to the evidence based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program. The training addressed various international suicide prevention strategies and filled a void in nursing curriculum. Moreover, it empowered students to engage in suicide prevention efforts in a northwestern state, which ranks among the highest for suicide in the USA.

Speaker
Biography:

Fredricka Gilje holds a PhD, Master’s and Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. She has 40 years of experience as a Nurse Educator in Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs in North Dakota, Montana, Washington and Alaska. In addition she engages in international collaboration in Nursing Research in Norway and Sweden. She has authored and co-authored various publications in nursing journals and books including articles concerning caring for suicidal persons. She is a Board Member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-Montana Chapter and serves on a local suicide prevention coalition in a state located in northwestern USA.

Abstract:

Internationally, little is known of educational content focused on suicide prevention in undergraduate nursing curricula. Through 2014, there were no known published research studies on implementation of suicide prevention training in a BSN curriculum, despite the need for such instruction as cited by various international healthcare and nursing initiatives. The aim of this multi-method study was to describe senior baccalaureate students’ responses to an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer which was implemented in a required course. Data were collected utilizing a pre & post-survey questionnaire administered to 150 students in four classes of a psychiatric nursing course from 2012 through 2014. The quantitative results were statistically significant (p<0.000) indicating an overall positive rating of the training. From the qualitative data, the main theme was ‘becoming capable intervening with persons at risk for suicide’. Students responded favorably to the evidence based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program. The training addressed various international suicide prevention strategies and filled a void in nursing curriculum. Moreover, it empowered students to engage in suicide prevention efforts in a northwestern state, which ranks among the highest for suicide in the USA.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Su-Fen Cheng has completed her Ph.D. at the age of 34 years from University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in the USA. She is an Associate Professor of National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences and teaches pediatric nursing. Her research focus is on nursing education and pediatric nursing. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Background: The flipped classroom (FC) teaching strategy has been used in recent year. Literature showed that FC can help students to improve their self-directed learning (SDL). However, little is known about the application of FC to nursing education. Objectives: The objectives of the study are to implement FC in a Pediatric Nursing course and to evaluate its effects on SDL. Method: A quasi experimental research design with the intervention of the FC teaching strategy was used. A total of 94 RN to BSN students were asked to participate this study. Forty seven students took the Pediatric Nursing, and the other 47 students took non-Pediatric Nursing course. The data was collected before and after the implementation of the FC. Cheng, Kuo, Turton & Lee-Hsieh (2010) Self-Directed Learning Instrument (SDLI) was used to measure students' learning outcomes. Results: Students who took Pediatric Nursing course with FC teaching strategy had a significant higher score on SDL than students who did not take Pediatric Nursing course. The FC teaching strategy increased students learning motivation, planning and implementation, and interpersonal communication significantly. The students who used FC stated that the FC teaching strategy can improve their clinical reasoning (100%) and problem solving ability (98%). The mean satisfaction score of teaching was 9.18 (SD= .78), the mean satisfaction score of FC was 8.98 (SD= .96). Conclusion: The FC teaching strategy can improve students’ SDL, help students engage in teamwork. The authors suggested to implement FC teaching strategy to RN to BSN students.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Jennifer Loke, a lecturer at the University of Hull, is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. She was awarded the Professor Sir Ron Cook International Scholarship in 2012 which has provided her the opportunity to extend her researh work outside the UK. Dr Loke is committed to integrating research with pedagogic practices, in the hope to benefit learners who are responsible for delivering nursing care and also, service users who are receiving the care. She is also keen on supporting others’ learning; this paper is a research project she led and supported the learning of colleagues and students. Her research interests include caring behaviours, critical theories, simulation learning and leadership and management in healthcare. Learn more about Dr Loke at http://www.kwlee.karoo.net/

Abstract:

The growing need for nurturing non-technical caring behaviours amongst nursing students may have resulted in the increasing emphasis on high fidelity simulation scenario learning. Given the current resources in higher education, many nursing faculties faced challenges in using this advanced but costly technology. That being the case, digital technologies such as podcasting were encouraged to allow open access learning to reduce cost. In light of the developments in higher education and also, in the context of limited evidence regarding the use of podcasting with simulations on caring behaviours; a mixed-methods design was employed to investigate the blended approach to learning using medium fidelity simualtion scenarios and podcasting. The second year full time undergraduate nursing students at a University in North England were potential participants. Students who consented were assigned to intervention and control groups. While all participants received low and high fidelity simulation learning sessions, the intervention group received an additional medium fidelity simulation scenario and podcasting learning session. Students’ caring behaviour were evaluated at various stages of the research. Students from the intervention group were invited to participate in a focus group discussion to share their perspectives on the various simulation learning strategies and their effects on their learning of caring behaviours. Both quantitative and qualitative findings supported the blended approach to learning.There are implications for nursing faculties to carefully craft a blended approach for nurturing student caring behaviours. The application of our study is not only important to nursing, but also to all who engaged in simulation teaching.

Speaker
Biography:

Over a decade of experience providing clinical care and disease management to the pediatric and adult Cystic Fibrosis population at Children's National, Washington, DC which encompasses genetic testing newborn screening for diagnosis and treatment of cystic fibrosis, caused be a single-gene defects due to inherited or spontaneous mutations. In 2009 conceptualized and implemented a program for the advancement of Genetic/Genomic awareness and education for the 2,000 nurses employeed by Children's National Health System that lead to participation in nation wide genetic/genomic education grant in 2012-2013, MINC Study. This work continues today with The National Institute of Health (NIH).

Abstract:

Genomics is “personalized healthcare” in action. Understanding genomics is essential for all clinical nurses and nurse leaders. However, most nurses have limited knowledge of genetics/genomics, how it translates into their practice or the Essentials of Genetic and Genomic Nursing Competencies.1 Genomic competencies include family history assessment, understanding targeted therapies, and assessing variability in patients’ responses to medications based upon genomic profiles. Perspectives of the nurse champion will be offered and the various strategies that were implemented for introducing genomics to clinical nurses in a 300-bed mid-Atlantic pediatric Magnet® health care system which employs approximately 2000 nurses. This institution was selected to participate in “Method for Introducing New Competencies (MINC)” study. A transformative nursing practice approach was established with collaboration amongst targeted leadership champions in administration, nursing, genetics and experts in the community. A multi-modality communication/education program was developed based on Everett Rogers’s Diffusion of Innovations Theory.2 Genomic competencies were selected with an emphasis on genomic relevancy aligned with the Centers for Disease Control Public Health Genomics3 themes and specialty specific diseases as a framework. The approach culminated into a pervasive knowledge-based strategy that incorporated interactive continuing education offerings, advanced practice nurse-led rounds, interprofessional collaboration, and family history tools. Educational advertising juggernaut campaigns with tag-lined genomic messages were used to intensify interest, awareness and relevancy. Program outcome achievements; increased awareness, knowledge and translation into practice. Outcomes were measured using baseline and post-project statistics from the Genetics and Genomics in Nursing Practice Survey and evaluation of individual hospital educational offerings and action plans. Learner satisfaction scores following each educational offering were consistently greater than 85%. The achievements of the interventions translated into practice through the collaboration with the genetic molecular biologists and genetic counselors that lead to expanded genetic testing and support capabilities in the health care system, development of guidelines for nurse initiated genetic referrals, and the adoption of a Family History Tool into practice. The goal of sharing these experiences, barriers, successes, and recommendations of this healthcare systems approach is to aid others introduce “new (genomic) knowledge” because the future is now.

Svetlana Kostronina

Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia

Title: Personality structure of future medical staff
Speaker
Biography:

Svetlana Kostromina completed her Ph.D. at the age of 29 at Moscow State Pedagogical University and Dr. of Sciences at the age of 39 at Saint-Petersburg State University. She is a professor of the Department of Psychology and Pedagogy of Personaland Professional Development, President of Saint-Petersburg Psychological Society. She has more than 65 publications in reputed Russian and foreign journals.

Abstract:

Personality structure of a professional is a system of interrelated individual characteristics which determine peculiarities of their behaviour typical of various situations. As a rule, in the course of studies, professional development outpaces personal development. Specialists starting work turn out to be immature, which affects the quality of their work and relationships with others. Our research is aimed at studying personality structure of future nurses (240 first-, second- and third-year students, aged 18-21). The methods of the research are: «Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire» (16PF - 105-С) by R.B. Cattell, Plutchik-Kellerman-Konte technique (Life Style Index), Milton Rokeach’s technique «Value Survey» (RVS). It was found out that low scores on factors F (restraint М1=4.41, σ=1.76; М2=4.57, σ=2.03; М3=4.30, σ=2.09) and N (straightforwardness М1=4.31, σ=1.72; М2=4.54, σ=1.8; М3=3.85, σ=1.27) are common characteristics of future nurses. At the same time, delicacy and the ability to empathize (М1=6.11, σ=1.91) characteristic of 1st-year students are replaced by greater toughness (М1=6.11, σ=1.91) and straightforwardness (М2=4.54, σ=1.8) in their 2nd year. By the 3rd year, a decrease in self-esteem (М3=4.00) and an increase in suspicion (М3=5.19) can be clearly traced. Among psychological defences, projection dominates in all respondents. But evidently, 3rd-year students use such psychological defences as repression (М3=36.7) and regression (М2=51.3) more often. In personality structure, a high level of ambitions decreases self-esteem and has an inverse relationship (р=0.03) with such qualities as responsibility, diligence and consideration. Graduates’ orientation towards materially secure life is interrelated (р=0.01) with greater relaxation, calmness, emotional maturity, realistic attitudes and stable interests.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Robyn Rosina has completed her Doctorate in 2009 at the University Technology, Sydney. Robyn has published a range book chapters, journal ariticles and conferences over many years. She is an academic and researcher at the University of Newcastle, Newcastle. Robyn is part of a research team including the Australian Catholic University, North Sydney.

Abstract:

The dynamic of clinical education has changed immensely without responsive change in nurse clinical teaching pedagogy or skills. The context for clinical teaching is gradually shifting from universities back to hospitals with nurse teachers swirling in this change professionally and industrially. The teaching skills required have rarely been described or evaluated but assumed present alongside clinical experience. The professional development and leadership potential of this role has been neglected despite the complexity and demand for high-level clinical teaching and assessment skills, for an increasingly diverse student group. This paper will present the progress of a program of educational research that has included several components. This paper will present the results of a pilot survey with two aims: to identify the required skills of a nurse clinical teacher and to explore the professional issues challenging the clinical learning environment. This work has tested the results of a previous study and laid the foundation for a systematic review currently underway with some early findings to present. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary clinical education is undergoing significant change in both context and pedagogy. Nursing needs evidence to contribute and position itself effectively to influence this change. This research work will make a significant contribution to enable a nursing contribution to clinical education reform into the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Pazit Azuri is a Dean of Nursing Science School at Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College. She is a nurse for 20 years. Most of her career involved regulatory management of quality care in the Israeli Ministry of Health, and teaching in BSN programs at Tel Aviv University. She believe that the first step in improving communication in healthcare is to educate the student about communication skills and the power of knowledge sharing as integral elements in quality healthcare.

Abstract:

The first step in improving communication in healthcare is to educate the student about communication skills and the power of knowledge sharing as integral elements in quality healthcare. The purpose of this project was to combine the teaching of communication skills with clinical reasoning exercises in a Communication Patient-Caregiver Simulation (CPCS) to study feasibility of the approach, the effect on learners’ self-efficacy and attitude toward learning communication skills, and the effect of providing multiple sources of immediate, collaborative feedback. Simulated scenarios are designed to ensure patient safety and prevent treatment errors in risk-prone situation such as work overload. The sessions were evaluated using a retrospective questionnaire to 80 students including the advantages and disadvantages from the Communication Patient-Caregiver Simulation (CPCS). Results indicate a positive impact on attitudes toward learning communication skills and self-efficacy regarding communication in the clinical setting. Also, learners considered feedback by peers, and faculty valuable. In addition, the instructor and actor will also evaluating the student's performance. At the data analysis phase, we will compare the identical questionnaire throughout the training and clinical experiences period, to see whether the students' confidence and communication skills have improved as a result of the simulations.

Speaker
Biography:

Sandra is a PhD nursing student at Queens University, Kingston Ontario, Canada. Her area of research is Clinical Teaching. She is Director, Clinical Education, Humber College and in that role is responsible for all aspects of nursing clinical education in the School of Health Science. Sandra has presented her model of support for clinical education at other national conferences and her current research investigates the use of rubrics in supporting clinical teacher effectiveness and student self-regulated learning.

Abstract:

Canadian nursing programs clinical practicums are almost entirely staffed by part time clinical teachers. It has been suggested that while these nurses are clinical experts they often lack pedagogical knowledge of how to teach nursing students. In attempting to identify appropriate supports for Clinical Teachers it was determined that there was a lack of measurement tools to assess the current state of clinical teacher pedagogical knowledge. In fact, only one instrument developed and tested by Wolf, Beitz, Peters and Wieland (2009) was found. The Clinical Teacher Knowledge Test instrument utilized a 40 item multiple-choice test developed based on clinical teaching literature and case studies. An assessment of psychometric properties and a thematic analysis of the study results were conducted by the authors. Most of the teachers in the study found that items related to the teacher role and the patient, student teacher relationships, student counseling approaches, the use of theory in clinical teaching, student rights and the responsibilities of teachers with regards to their rights and responsibilities as educators were challenging. The researchers recommended that further research be conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the tool and identify further areas to support clinical teachers in their work. With permission of the original authors, an expert Canadian clinical educator panel adapted the test to the Canadian context. This research presents the psychometric properties of the Canadian Clinical Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge Test after implementation with new and returning Humber College nursing clinical teachers. An analysis of the study findings and suggestions for appropriate resources to support the work of Nursing Clinical Teachers will be presented.

Speaker
Biography:

With the current position of deputy program convenor for the Bachelor of Midwifery, Donovan has been actively involved in the development of new curriculum starting in 2016 for the Bachelor of midwifery at University of Newcastle. The new curriculum brings teaching innovation not previously used in undergraduate midwifery programs such as cadaveric anatomy labs, 3rd year clinical viva’s and the use of technology to deliver midwifery teaching across a wide demographic context. In addition to this Donovan is the chair of the Bachelor of midwifery simulation committee and is responsible for strategic planning for the continuing advancement of midwifery teaching simulation programs, ensuring students become leaders in the field of obstetric emergency hi fidelity simulation and learning. Donovan is also a integral team member of the iLIVE project, looking at the integrated learning that meets the needs of individual students, clinical venues and universities.

Abstract:

The importance of developing and sustaining welcoming and supportive academic and clinical environments for students undertaking health care programs is not new (Carolan-Olah & Kruger, 2014). However, the ways in which these environments interrelate and impact on student retention rates, academic success and engender professional belongingness is unclear. This study is exploring the student experience of nursing and midwifery students from the University of Newcastle. Bridging the theory practice gap using the concept of link lecturers (linking the academic context and knowledge with the clinical context and skills) may positively impact on nursing and midwifery students’ academic connectedness, professional belongingness and academic outcomes. Exploring nursing and midwifery students’ sense of connectedness to the academic environment and learning activities as well as the development of a sense of professional belongingness within different models of clinical placement and linked academic support. The study objectives include identification of: • Clinical placement models that best support a sense of professional belonging • Academic practices that best support student learning in the clinical environment • Academic practices that best support student success in the academic environment Improving students’ sense of professional belongingness and student connectedness with their academic environment has the potential to increase student retention rates and success. Clinical placements provide opportunities for professional socialisation and experiential learning; there is evidence of a pivotal relationship between the extent to which students’ experience belongingness and their capacity and motivation to learn when undertaking clinical placements (Levett-Jones & Lathlean, 2008). The use of a link lecturer may afford a practical way to strengthen the connection and belonging of nursing and midwifery students.

Speaker
Biography:

Hung-Cheng Tai is an Assistant Professor working for the department of General Education in Chang Gung University of Science and Technology. He has been teaching English for nursing students at different levels for over ten years. His research interests include technology enhanced writing instruction, educational psychology for English writing teaching and learning and English for nursing purposes.

Abstract:

This one year study was a qualitative research using the TPACK model– technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge to develop a multidisciplinary course for university nursing students. Aims are to investigate the participants’ perceptions about the: (1) technological knowledge learning; (2) pedagogical knowledge experiences; and (3) content knowledge acquisition from the program. Participants included 50 nursing students conveniently selected from a language classroom, an English language teacher and a teaching assistant (TA). Learners were grouped into 7 to 8 members each, and were required to produce short videos served as health education materials speaking in English as their foreign language. Seven data collection instruments were used –participants’ individual interviews, learners’ group interviews, course satisfaction questionnaire, tasks portfolios, intergroup evaluation forms, Teacher/TA reflective journals and classroom observations. Data were analysed through the grounded theory and the codes were further processed by the constant comparative method and the triangulation strategy was also employed. Results demonstrate that students recognized the coursedesign as interesting and inspiring and enabled them to learn technology and content knowledge. The TA was benefitted from the pedagogical knowledge and the teacher focused on the linguistic knowledge teaching. All participants perceived the course as demanding and exhausting. Some students preferred the traditional teaching method solely emphasized on the content knowledge for its easier implementation and achievement. Teaching implications arethen discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Jinbo Fang has completed her Ph.D. at the age of 33 years from ChiangMai University. She is the associate professor in school of nursing, Sichuan university. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to investigate social problem solving ability and compare it according to different teaching-learning strategies in Chinese baccalaureate nursing students. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional research design was conducted with a stratified random sample of 485 Chinese baccalaureate nursing students. The Chinese Version of the Social Problem Solving scale was used. Descriptive analyses, independent t-test and one-way analysis of variance were applied to analyze the data. Results: The average scores of Chinese nursing students’ social problem solving in Rational Problem Solving subscale was 10.36±3.94; Positive Problem Orientation subscale was 11.05±3.58, Negative Problem Orientation subscale was 6.57±4.09, Avoidance Style subscale was 4.53±4.41, and Impulsivity/Carelessness Style subscale was 3.99±3.18. The final year nursing students presented the highest positive social problem solving scores. Meanwhile, the highest negative problem solving scores were found in third year nursing students. Nursing students with experience in self-directed learning and problem-based learning presented a significant higher scores in Positive Problem Orientation subscale and lower scores in negative Avoidance Style subscale comparing with non-experienced group. Critical thinking training experience group, however, had higher negative problem solving scores comparing with non-experience group. Conclusions: The existing variation in students’ social problem solving may be helpful for nursing faculty to identify student’s characteristics. Self-directed learning and problem-based learning could be recommended as suitable teaching-learning model to improve nursing students’ social problem-solving ability.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Xianqiong Feng received her undergraduate degree from Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Master degree in Nursing from Chiang Mai University of Thailand, and Doctoral degree in Nursing Administration from Marquette University in Wisconsin, US. Her research interests include health services and outcomes research, nursing quality and patient safety issues, and research on vulnerable populations. She has published more than 50 professional articles and edited (or coauthored) several professional books. Dr. Feng has rich teaching experience. She has taught a number of courses at both undergraduate and graduate level.

Abstract:

Background and Purpose: Building nursing students’ research capacity and increase their research competency is one of the major educational goals for nursing programs, however, very limited valid and reliable instruments could be found to measure nursing students’ research competency. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the reliability and construct validity of the Nursing Students Research Competency Scale (NSRCS). Methods: Data were obtained from 194 baccalaureate nursing students in a nursing school in southwest part of China. The students from two grades were involved: grade 2011 (N=100) and grade 2012(N=94). The scale was administered before and after the course of Nursing Research. 99 were collected at the beginning of the course, 95 collected when the course was completed. Results: Cronbach's alpha for this 24-item NSRCS was 0.982. Exploratory factor analysis supported a 2-factor solution that explained 75.308% of the variance. Conclusions: The NSRCS may be a useful tool for measurement of nursing students’ research capacity and competency.

Speaker
Biography:

Farai Makoni is currently in the process of completing his PhD at University of Southampton. He worked in a range of healthcare services including, men’s, women’s and child and adolescent mental healthcare settings. His area of specialty is Forensic Mental Health. He spent his clinical career working within a Specialist and Forensic Mental Health setting within the UK. Prior to moving into a lectureship role, he was a Team Manager for a Secure Forensic Mental Health for Young people Unit. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer at Bucks New University and researcher at University of Southampton, UK. He has published work across the globe in reputable conferences for example, the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Shangahai International Nursing Conference II. His work has also been published in other conferences within the UK and USA. Research interests include inter-professional education, reflective practice, collaboration, risk mitigation and widening participation within higher education.

Abstract:

Reflective practice has gained prominence within the health, education and social care sectors in particular within the United Kingdom (UK). This prominence has been driven and shaped by differing assertions and counter-assertions about the relevance of reflective approaches in shaping collaborative enterprises that may help meet patient satisfaction and outcomes agendas. Given the competing assertions within the literature discourse, an emerging model is proposed in order to make a connection between the significance and relevance of reflective practice meetings (RPMs) as an aspect of inter-professional education and its application within clinical contexts. Emphasis is placed on how professionals engage with the cross-disciplinary viewpoints in order to help understand the nature of caring in differing caring contexts. Notably, some contributors within the literature sources posit that a divergence of opinion about the contribution of RPMs as an aspect of inter-professional education exists. For example, some note that inter-professional education (IPE) represents a particular challenge for those engaged with the task of facilitating knowledge construction and knowledge transfer due to the social power issues, real or perceived, as reflected within different professional disciplines. Advocates for IPE postulate that individuals have to utilize IPE as something that helps professionals from diverse and distinct disciplines to identify the different lenses that help to foster a collaborative ethos within a context of shifting priorities. Consequently, engaging with the differing viewpoints within an RPM context may contribute to how IPE is conceptualized for example is it about informing, conforming or transforming professional discourse. This paper reports on a Qualitative study conducted within a Secure Forensic Adolescent Mental Health setting in the UK. The study offers findings that have a potential to aid an understanding of the theoretical and practical implications of utilizing Reflective Practice Meetings as an aspect of IPE. The study explored the processes that occur during the weekly inter-professional reflective practice meetings within a Secure Forensic Mental Health Adolescent Unit. The study was informed by a case study approach underpinned by ethnographic tenets. Data collection methods utilized included discursive methods complemented by Participant Observations (PO). Additionally, data was gathered through Reflective logs and one-to-to semi-structured interviews. Data collection triangulation methods for completeness of the phenomenon were utilized. An eclectic data analysis process was utilized notably; the analytical lens utilized within this study was informed by a combination of grounded theory approaches with social-psychology discourse analysis framework.

ChuehFen Lu

Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan

Title: The needs of teaching on suicide nursing-a learner centered approach
Speaker
Biography:

ChuehFen, Lu was a psychiatric nurse then a senior lecturer at Chung Gung University of Science and Technology for 20 years, Taiwan. She is an associate professor, after earned the PhD. degree in school of Nursing at Glasgow University.

Abstract:

Background: According to the statistics of Taiwan Ministry of Health and Welfare, over 90% of suicide events were reported by hospitals since 2008, indicating nurses are situated at the forefront of suicide management. Suicide intervention is essential competence for nursing education. Methods: Students of two year bachelor program were the study participants because they are the major manpower currently. The adult learning theory which addressed learner centre concept was adopted in the study. Focus groups and reflective writing were administrated. A semi-structure guideline included both professional and individual viewpoints and a confidence self-rating score of 100 points was applied. The data was transcribed verbatim and analysed by content analysis. Results: Four focus groups (n=32), and 141 reflective wiring were collected and analysed. The average score of confidence to take care suicidal patients was rather low (68/100). Four major needs of learning are i) smoothing their language over the culture sensitive suicide assessment ii) clarifying the suicide myths iii) increasing the completeness of assessment and iv) delivering empathetic responses. Conclusion: The study finding provides learner centre perspective to advance nursing education especially on the cultural sensitive health problem. Also, the findings can be woven into design of scenario teaching, and students can practise before they start their professional career.

Speaker
Biography:

M S Ajimsha is a young researcher in the field of neuro-rehabilitation and myofacial release. After receiving his Post-graduate degree in Neuro-Physical therapy, he has obtained a PhD in Neuro-rehabilitation from India, a PhD in Myofascial Release from UK and Doctor of Osteopathy and management degree in health care from Spain. Currently he is working as a specialist, Physical therapy in the Physical therapy department of Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar. He is the chairman of the ‘Myofascial Therapy and Research Foundation’ India. His areas of interest include neuro engineering, robotics, virtual reality, pain, myofascial release and neuroplasticity. In 2014 his paper was awarded as the best oral paper in the ‘Qatar international pain conference’. Recently he won the best free paper award in the ‘Abu Dhabi neuro rehabilitation conference’ by WFNR. He had more than 80 conference proceedings and 20 high impact journal publications. He is a renowned resource person in the field of Myofascial release and his contributions are highly appreciated across the globe.

Abstract:

Objective: To investigate whether Self Myofascial Release (SMFR) technique can reduces pain and disability in non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) in comparison with a control group receiving a sham Myofascial release (Sham-MFR) in nursing professionals. Methods: Design: Randomized, controlled, single blinded trial. Participants: Nursing professionals (N=57) with NSLBP. Interventions: SMFR group or control group. The SMFR were administered by the nurses themselves whereas the sham-MFR was applied by physical therapists in a predetermined dosage (16 sessions /4 weeks). Main outcome measure: The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) for subjective pain experience and Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (QBPDS) to assess the disability associated with NSLBP. The primary outcome measure was the difference in MPQ and QBPDS scores between week 1 (pretest score), week 4 (posttest score), and follow-up at week 12 after randomization. Results: The simple main effects analysis showed that the SMFR group performed better than the control group in weeks 4 and 12 (P<0.005). The patients in the SMFR group reported a 62.6% reduction in their pain and 36.3% reduction in functional disability as shown in the MPQ and QBPDS scores in week 4, whereas patients in the control group reported a 11.5% and 4.6% reduction in their MPQ and QBPDS scores in week 4, which persisted as a 43.8% reduction of pain and 29.2% reduction of functional disability in the follow-up at week 12 in the SMFR group compared to the baseline. The proportion of responders, defined as participants who had at least a 50% reduction in pain between weeks 1 and 4, was 63% in the SMFR group and 0 in the control group. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that SMFR can be a useful tool in the management of NSLBP in nursing professionals than a control. A cost and time benefit analysis can be undertaken in the future studies. A major section of nursing professionals with NSLBP might benefit from the use of SMFR and can be taught as a LBP prevention strategy for nursing professionals.

Speaker
Biography:

Meryem Yavuz Van Giersbergen has completed her PhD in Surgical Nursing in 1998 at the Ege University. She became Docent of Surgical Nursing in 2006 and Professor in 2013. She was one of the founders (1997) and President of Turkish Surgical and Operating Room Nurses Association from 2008-2012. She has published 55 articles in international/national journals, 180 presentations at (inter)national congresses, 20 chapters in six books and has been an Editorial Board Member of (inter)national journals. She worked in 22 organization communities for national congresses (6 of them she was president), two international congresses and 40 sciences communities at national congresses. She has more than 50 speeches in congresses.

Abstract:

Quality health care is important issue for worldwide and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctoral degree nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders and policy makers. The first University School of Nursing opened in 1955 in Turkey. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. In 2001 six Universities provided nursing doctoral education while in 2015 20 Universities provided nursing doctoral education. In Turkey, the doctoral education in nursing is carried out with a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (PhD) via the Health Sciences Institutes. This presentation centers on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. The presentation will describe in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models of their own nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs together with other countries.

Speaker
Biography:

Amina Bargawi is graduated from Nursing College, King Abdul-Aziz University in 1992, later she pursued her journey in academic learning, as she has got MSN in community health nursing from King Saud University, MSc in Research Methodology & Statistics from Manchester University and MSc & PhD in Health Care Management from Wales University. She is a Co-Chairperson of Saudi Nursing Scientific Society since 2007 and Chairperson of Saudi Nursing advancement committee, since 2003. Currently, she is working at the Community and Preventive Medicine center and is holding several responsibilities, which include; coordinating of community health nursing services, coordinating of health informatics and statistics and coordinating the professional development of PHC nurse.

Abstract:

Throughout more than five decades, nursing profession in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has been facing remarkable changes. Nursing in Saud Arabia is considered a young profession, as just in 1960 the first Nursing School has been established. However, its development is not accelerating fast, as it was handicapped by limited educational opportunities, restricted by inadequate recruitment process, uncontrolled by weak regulation system and bonded by cultural & customs’ restrains. Not surprisingly, the inspiration of new Millennium (21stcentury) worked very well in advancing the nursing career in Saudi Arabia, and the development is going on. Practical steps toward advancing the nursing education are taking place, Nursing qualification is given a high priority and collaborative effort for re-designing the Saudi nursing image is continuing. In aspiration, given the currently effort of improvement, Nursing in Saudi Arabia is expected to be moved in to a bright future. the challenges in education , recruitment, management & nursing image will be overcame and all opportunities to reach Nursing excellence locally, regionally and globally will be grabbed. As a Conclusion; we were in gloomy eras restricted by challenges and hidden under Saudi desert’s sand, we are now in promising era struggling for rising up and planning the nursing road map & we will be on bright era moving upward, forward toward the light of recognition and accreditation.

Speaker
Biography:

Liu Changqing has been studying Clinical Medicine at West China School of Medicine of Sichuan University since 2014. He is now a doctoral degree candidate, majoring in nursing.

Abstract:

Purpose: To build the Chinese standards of teaching resources access and development of nursing undergraduate education. Methods: From May to July 2015, a questionnaire survey and expert consultation were performed in the nursing colleges and hospitals nationwide, in which the teaching resource configuration standard and implementation status of nursing undergraduate education were inquired, and then the standard of teaching resources access and development of nursing undergraduate education were also developed based on the present standard of nursing undergraduate education in China. Results: A total of 22 nursing colleges and hospitals, totaling 285 valid experts were included. The experts’ opinions on the standards of teaching resources of nursing undergraduate education were recycled and generalized. There were six domains finally included in the developed standards, which were the education budget and allocation of resources, infrastructure, clinical teaching bases, books and information services, educational experts, educational exchanges. And the experts’ consensus rate was much more than 90.2%. Conclusions: The standard of teaching resources access and development of nursing undergraduate education could be regarded as the guidance and reference for the development of nursing undergraduate education in China, and it should be well implemented.

Speaker
Biography:

Coming Soon

Abstract:

To determine the efficacy of different methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPCR) training in nurse personnel. In a prospective and observational study of 150 individuals in nurse personnel 4 different protocols of CPCR training were applied and their efficacy was investigated. Also, 12 months after the study course, 60 participants were asked to take apart in a theoretical and practical examination to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the 4 protocols. Nurse personnel with more duration of special work time obtained more scores. Also individuals with history of CPCR training in other courses were more successful. Comparison of different methods of CPCR learning showed that the workshop using interactive lecture as well as human model, educational film, and reference CPCR book has the highest efficacy in all groups. This protocol of CPCR training showed more efficacy in long-term post-delayed evaluation. This course also increased confidence for doing CPCR in nurse personnel.

Speaker
Biography:

Shi Fan Han is a Professor and Master Tutor of Shanxi Medical University, Dermatological Chief Physician of The First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University. He is the Editor-in-Chief of 5 journals of Shanxi Medical Periodical Press such as Chinese Nursing Research. He is also the Vice-President of Chinese Nursing Association, Shanxi branch. He has 30 years of work experience, mainly engages in nursing scientific research and trained over 20 Masters. He has applied for 2 patents, undertaken 6 scientific projects, published more than 14 works and 50 academic papers in reputed journals. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Objective: To explore the feasibility of the nurse's prescription right in China, to develop the requirements for the qualification of the applicant for the prescription right of nurse, and to determine the content of certain prescriptions in the specific circumstances. Methods: Literature review on the relevant articles/material with the contents of the nurse’s right of prescription home and abroad. Semi-structured depth interview method was used to interview 18 experts on whether the nurses can participate in the graded nursing decision and whether nurses with certain ability can make the decision. Using the self-made questionnaire “Nurses involved in graded nursing decision-recognition questionnaire”, 553 nurses completed questionnaires on willingness to nurse decision-making grading. Using the analytic hierarchy process, the 23 experts' judgment on the main body of the graded nursing was rated. Using semi-structured depth interview method, 17 experts were interviewed on the graded nursing quality assessment and training outline. The form of expert personal judgment and the "grading nursing qualification experts predict questionnaire" were used as a preliminary designing tool, 32 experts were asked to predict the graded nursing quality. The relatively important factors that might promote implementation of right of Chinese nurse prescribing weights setting were obtained by analytic hierarchy process. Using Delphi method, 2 rounds of consultation to 291 experts/times were performed, and determined its content on the fields of graded nursing decision, nurses' job description, decision making nurse in graded nursing work process and related management system, decision-making main body of clinical nursing, nurse authority of prescription application qualification, clinical nurses, diabetes specialist nurses, tumor specialist nurses, nurses in emergency department, community nurses in certain circumstances writing prescription, and nursing undergraduate added with nurse authority of prescription related courses.

  • Nursing practice
Speaker
Biography:

Heather J. Sobko, PhD, RN, APRN, CRRP is a specialist in the development of innovative tools that support patient engagement for improvement in quality of care and patient outcomes. Dr. Sobko completed her doctoral studies in Nursing and Informatics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and also has degrees in Psychology and Sociology. She completed a two-year National Research Service Award (NRSA) Post-doctoral Fellowship in Comparative Effective Research and is also a nationally certified readmission reduction fellow. She has published numerous papers and serves as a reviewer for several peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Chronic diseases - such as heart disease, diabetes, COPD, arthritis and asthma – are among the most common, costly and preventable health problems in the U.S. Innovative technological “tools of engagement” can effectively address intransigent inefficiencies in healthcare delivery including uneven distribution of quality, escalating costs and adverse lifestyles that tend to exacerbate these problems. A large and growing segment of the population suffers from chronic diseases and can benefit from improved spatial-temporal access to health resources that promote engagement via information and communication technologies designed to connect patients with health care providers. These strategies are particularly effective during transitions of care, a time of well-documented increased risks known to lead to ED visits and hospital readmissions. We implemented a comprehensive Care Transition System designed to support both patients and providers. The system gathers clinically relevant information from patients and automatically triages needs to promote efficacious, cost effective clinical workflow. The system calls out to patients throughout the thirty day time period following hospital discharge and assesses the need for support along four clinical domains: signs and symptoms, medication management, follow-up care and health behaviors. Patients respond using their telephone – an inexpensive, readily accessible tool requiring no special training or equipment. Clinicians receive information in real time through a web-based, nurse-designed dashboard where they complete clinical documentation and generate progress notes that can be securely shared with external providers and EHRs. Use of the system demonstrated an 86% patient response rate with a 23% reduction in ED visits and hospital readmissions.

Speaker
Biography:

Thomas Kropmans has obtained his MSc in Education, Psychology and Social Sciences and PhD in Medical Sciences (Clinical Decision Making) from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He was appointed as Senior Lecturer in Medical Informatics and Education at NUIG’s College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Science in Galway, Ireland in 2006. The OSCE Management Information System was developed, validated and implemented within his domain at the School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway and 22 prestigious Universities and Professional bodies worldwide. He has published and presented his research on OMIS data, at conferences in London, Malta, Singapore, Milan, Glasgow and Dubai.

Abstract:

Background: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an established tool in the repertoire of clinical assessment methods in nurse education. Identified benefits of OSCE assessment include development of students’ confidence in their clinical skills and preparation for clinical practice. Objectives: To explore electronic OSCE delivery and evaluate the benefits of using an electronic OSCE management system. To explore assessors’ perceptions of and attitudes to the computer based package. Design: This study was conducted using electronic software in the management of a four station OSCE assessment with a cohort of first year undergraduate nursing students delivered over two consecutive years (n=203) in one higher education institution in Ireland. A quantitative descriptive survey methodology was used to obtain the views of the assessors on the process and outcome of using the software. Methods: OSCE documentation was converted to electronic format. Assessors were trained in the use of the OSCE management software package and laptops were procured to facilitate electronic management of the OSCE assessment. Following the OSCE assessment, assessors were invited to evaluate the experience. Results: Electronic software facilitated the storage and analysis of overall group and individual results thereby offering considerable time savings. Submission of electronic forms was allowed only when fully completed thus removing the potential for missing data. The feedback facility allowed the student to receive timely evaluation on their performance and to benchmark their performance against the class. Conclusions: Assessors’ satisfaction with the software was high. Analysis of assessment results can highlight issues around internal consistency being moderate and examiners variability. Regression analysis increases fairness of result calculations.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Jasper Tolarba has completed his Doctor of Nursing Practice with concentration on Leadership and Policy at Yale University, USA. He holds a Masters of Science in Nursing as well as a Masters in Education. He is the Director of Nursing at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Massachussetts, a large nationally recognized academic medical center. He also holds an adjunct faculty position at University of Massachusetts-Amherst in their College of Nursing. His written work appeared in the American Journal of Critical Care, The Philippine Daily Inquirer, and other publications. He has also lectured in various in international conferences on a similar topic

Abstract:

Background: Advanced practice nursing (APN) is broadly defined as nursing interventions that influence health care outcomes, including the direct care of individual patients, management of care for individuals and populations, administration of nursing and health care organizations, and the development and implementation of health policy (AACN Position Paper, 2004). APN has been widely successful and well received in the United States, Canada, Singapore, Japan, etc. and its practice is steadily on the rise internationally. This paper describes the emerging trend of advanced practice nursing worldwide. It discusses the significant contributions of advanced practice nurses and how they positively impact patients’ clinical outcome and explains why they are beneficial members of the health care team. Purpose: The goal of this paper was to describe the BIT model of care and the role of the APN. This was achieved through four specific aims: (1.) Describe the overall context and structure of the BIT, (2.) Describe the BIT members’ clinical and operational responsibilities, (3.) Describe the collaborative relationships among stakeholders, and (4.) Validate the overall BIT model of care and the role of APNs with a group process. Design: The conceptual framework used in this project to describe the overall framework of the BIT model of care was the Donabedian Model of Quality Health Care (Donabedian,1988). Methods: An initial description of the overall structure of the BIT and the roles and responsibilities of Advanced Practice Nurses was written. The multifocal roles of the APNs were also described as they function within the BIT model of care. The draft was validated via a group process involving all members of the BIT. Results: The draft of this paper was distributed to all members of the BIT and the group process of content validation showed an accurate description of the role of the APN in the BIT program with minor revisions. Conclusions: The BIT model of care is an evidence-based, proactive approach in providing psychiatric services to patients in a general medical inpatient setting. It has been proven effective and innovative, which has fueled replication of the BIT program in other hospitals in the United States. Results from this study can be used as template for other healthcare insitutions to replicate the program and utilize the APN role for its success.

Speaker
Biography:

Chris King is a Registered Nurse for both adult and paediatrics and has worked in many roles during her nursing career including in intensive care. She has worked as Primary Health Manager, Regional Manager in Aged Care, Clinical Facilitator for Edith Cowan University Western Australia and now as Unit Coordinator for the Training Centre for Subacute Care WA. With an interest in nursing education she is undertaking her PhD at the University of Notre Dame Australia and has presented at conferences in both Melbourne and Perth Australia. She is awaiting confirmation of a publication of her work on the development of a toolkit for nurses.

Abstract:

This presentation will illustrate the research method and toolkit development process of a PhD project undertaken for the purpose of supporting and guiding nursing staff to create a sense of belonging to the team, for students undertaking clinical placement. Literature suggests that the need to belong to any given community influences health and well-being, which in turn affects behavioural, emotional and cognitive responses. However student nurses are often in a vulnerable position of being excluded intentionally or otherwise from ward/unit activities leading to feelings of isolation and poor achievement. The toolkit is to be developed from data extracted from a series of rounds conducted using the Delphi method. The toolkit will be distributed to selected clinical areas for use during periods of clinical practicum for students and evaluation of its applicability, usefulness and sustainability will be conducted. For the purpose of this study, the research strategy is a sequential mixed method which consists of two distinct phases, qualitative and quantitative research. The aim is to connect the results of the initial qualitative phase to the design, implementation and evaluation of the subsequent quantitative phase. The significance of this research lies in designing a relevant and practical ‘belongingness’ toolkit for nurses working in the clinical practice setting. It will encourage and enable a fundamental shift in attitude towards students by taking into account individual personal values and characteristics, the impact of the direct environment along with the need to belong in order to create a learning environment.

Speaker
Biography:

Kimberly New is the Executive Director of the International Health Facility Diversion Association, an organization that specializes in the prevention, detection and response to drug diversion by healthcare personnel. Kim help healthcare facilities across the US develop their drug diversion programs with the goal of protecting patients, staff and facilities from the harm frequently associated with diversion. Kim has extensive clinical experience as a nurse, and has worked for many years as a healthcare lawyer and a Compliance Officer. Kim is a frequent author and national speaker. She has been featured in USA Today and the Wall Street Journal.

Abstract:

Prescription drug abuse is a well-recognized issue in the US, Europe and elsewhere in the world. Healthcare personnel are not immune. While there are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of drug theft or diversion activities by healthcare personnel, diversion occurs regularly in facilities across the US and Europe. Cases reported in European literature bear striking similarity to North American cases. Access to narcotics represents an underappreciated occupational hazard and patient safety risk. Harm to patients from healthcare personnel who divert opioids may take many forms, including care delivered by an impaired provider, untreated pain, and infection risks stemming from tampering with injectable drugs. Since 2004, there have been 5 recognized hepatitis C outbreaks in the US associated with infected healthcare workers who diverted injectable opiods, involving more than 32,000 potentially exposed patients. Healthcare personnel who steal opioids are at substantial risk as well. They may suffer the physical and social implications of opioid abuse, risk criminal prosecution, and even overdose and die. The community may be impacted by DUI-related incidents involving impaired healthcare personnel. A formal program is essential to properly prevent, detect, and respond to diversion. A comprehensive program of staff education is crucial to fostering a culture of vigilance and open communication. Staff must be informed of the scope of the problem, the risks associated with diversion, and how to protect themselves and their colleagues. Basic patient and staff safety considerations demand effective, reliable safeguards to maintain the security of prescription opioids in healthcare settings.

Speaker
Biography:

Hana Hajduchová has completed his Ph.D. at the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice in Czech republic, Faculty of Health and Social Studies. Since 2004 she works at the same faculty at the Department of Nursing and Midwifery. Her professional focus, inter alia, is the issue of nursing care in psychiatry. She is a registered general nurse.

Abstract:

This research survey was aimed at identifying the opinions of nurses regarding the issue of patient safety in the use of restraints on patients in hospitals in the Czech Republic. The research was designed as a sociological study and was accomplished through the technique of a questionnaire survey using an interviewer. The sample group of nurses included nurses working in shifts on the hospital wards and was based on the needs of the project and the methodology of the Institute of Health Information and Statistics of the Czech Republic. The entire sample consisted of 772 nurses. Most nurses considered the likelihood of an injury to the patient in the use of means of restraint (specifically when strapping the patient) to be negligible (48%) and low (36.9%). Nurses working in surgical and medical wards reported a higher likelihood of patient injuries during restriction while bedridden than nurses working in other departments. The existence of a standard or regulation that would regulate the procedure for the use of restraints, if a patient is restless, aggressive or at risk of self-harm was confirmed by 91.3% of nurses. Immobilization and restraint in justifiable cases in surgeries are carried out by 65.5% of nurses. To prevent complications connected with the use of restraints, we consider continual training sessions and education of medical personnel important in connection with the use of restraints and auditing in maintaining standards of nursing care and the prevention of complications associated with the use of restrictive procedures, and then using these measures only in necessary and justified cases.

Speaker
Biography:

Working as a associate professor of Psychiatric Nursing Department at Adnan Menderes University College of Nursing in Aydin,Turkey. Dr.Arslantaş currently nursing concepts, problem solving therapy,nursing concepts,group therapy,therapeutic relationship to undergraduate,graduate students at Adnan Menderes University.The main issues are related to the area of group therapy,problem solving therapy.She has extensive experiences preventing violence to nurses and patient’s and their families psychosocial problems and with burden.She worked as Chief Nurse in Psychiatry Department and conducted education of chronic psychiatric patients and their families, and conducted hospital supported home visits and clinic group therapies as therapist and co-therapist.

Abstract:

This study is conducted as a cross sectional research in order to investigate the depression, internet addiction and loneliness relationship in adolescents of high school students. It is targeted to reach 690 students. In the study, Personal Information Form, Beck Depression Scale, Internet Addiction Scale and UCLA Loneliness Scale are used. In the evaluation of the data, descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage values, minimum, maximum, average and standard deviation), and Pearson correlation coefficients are used. When the characteristics of adolescents of high school students who participated the survey are examined, it is found that 46.0% of the adolescents are women, 30.6% of them study in 9th grade, 30.9% of them are 17 years old, 74.3% of them have internet connections in their homes. It is determined that the level of internet addiction in the adolescents with depression tendency ( =19.40±18.61) is significantly higher than the adolescents without depression tendecy ( =9.81±11.77) and the level of loneliness in the adolescents with depression tendency ( =52.61±6.57) is significantly higher than the adolescents without depression tendency ( =50.75±6.74). It is determined that there is no significant relation between the levels of loneliness and internet addiction in the adolescents (r=0.011; p>0.05). Besides, it is determined that there is a positive and high level relation between the depression level and internet addiction of the adolescents (r=0.384; p<0.05) and there is a positive and low level relation between the loneliness level and internet addiction of the adolescents (r=0.090; p<0.05)

Speaker
Biography:

Nurdan GEZER is assistant professor. She is working Surgical Nursing Department in Aydin School of Health Adnan Menderes University in TURKEY. She worked as a nurse for 10 years. She has working as a nursing teacher for 15 years. She gave nursing education and midwifery education between 1999 and 2009. She has giving lesson nursing management and surgical nursing areas for 1999. Her research interest is nursing skill, critical thinking, student nurses conflict management styles, nursing education, nursing students behaviours, patient education.

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the nursing care-oriented attitudes and behavior towards the nurse-patient interaction. Method: This study was conducted as a descriptive and cross-section. In this study, the ability of sample to the hospital's intensive care unit, received a total of 379 nurses working in medical and surgical clinics. The study reached 221 nurses. The data were collected Care Nursing Patient Interaction Scale (CNPI) and nurse identification form was used. Points can be taken from this scale it is between 70- 350. The scale of humanism, hope, awareness, helping relations, expressing emotions, problem solving, education, environment, requirements, there are 10 sub-groups as spirituality. Results: The α value of the study was found to be 0.98. CNPI average total score was 313.61 ± 36.81 Nurses. Considering the average scores by gender, women, 315.73 ± 34.01, 299.62 ± 50.21 males scored points. There was no difference between the total scores by gender, significant differences were found in the expression of emotion subscales(p<0,05). Mean total score according to the service they receive from the scale difference was found between the nurses they work, it was found that higher scores on the environmental subgroup of intensive care nurses. (p<0,05). The expression of emotions scale scores by gender were taken by men in low dimensions. The scale is based on clinical nurses working in intensive care nurses environmental dimensions of the reason for the high score in the intensive care unit may be associated with the patient-centered work.

Speaker
Biography:

Ya-Lie Ku as an assistant professor has completed her Master in Nursing Science from Penn State University and conducted the spiritual studies for more than 10 years from Fooyin University School of Nursing. She personally has published approximately 25 journals and 25 conference papers with one book as following Ku, Y. L. (2010). Spirituality in Nursing: Theory, Practice, Education, & Research Taipei, Taiwan: Farseeing Publishing Group. ISBN:9789861941714

Abstract:

This article is to integrative review of literature on spiritual care in nursing. In this article, the keywords “systematic review,” “spiritual care,” and “nursing” were used to search the CINAHL database. A total of 19 articles were identified in the CINAHL database. The integrative review of 11 systematic reviews or evidence-based papers revealed six categories: the definition of spirituality, concept analysis of spiritual care, spiritual assessment, spiritual care in the clinical setting, ethical issues, and nursing education. Additional studies should conduct concept analysis of spiritual care for different patient groups. Moreover, there is a need to conduct a concept analysis of the ethical role of spiritual care in nursing. Finally, spiritual care in nursing education should emphasize the content and strategies of teaching spiritual care with cultural sensitivity, particularly for effective therapeutic listening. Spiritual care should assess from generic to specific aspects, and develop the comprehensive assessment steps for spiritual care in nursing. Additionally, the mixed method is suggested to study spiritual care in nursing. Nursing researchers should apply the manual therapeutic life review interventions for existential and religious domains as the evidence-based interventions for spiritual care in the different care units to generalize the validity of these spiritual interventions.

Speaker
Biography:

Yafen Mao has completed his bachelor from Shanghai Second Military University. She is the Full-time secretary of Shanghai nursing quality control center. She host over 5 scientific research projects, participate in more than 10 projects. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of Chinese Nursing Management and Shanghai nursing.

Abstract:

Tracking Management is a commonly used method in business management, It looking for some causes both individuals and system after adverse event occurred,remediation and tracking. we always used the tracking management in the nursing practice.This study is to explore the role of tracking management applied to patient safety management in nursing practice. We established a tracking management teams, implementied two kinds of methods to tracking related root reasons for adverse nursing events,one is case tracking,another is system tracking;took corresponding measures in terms of risk level of adverse nursing events, and updated or revised the system, to let these adverse nursing events never happen again.After implement of the tracking management, incidence rate of adverse nursing events was significantly decreased , and reported rate of the adverse nursing events was significantly increased(P < 0. 01for both) . In a word,the tracking management play an active role in ensuring nursing safety. Which reduces the occurrence of adverse nursing events, and ensure patient’s safety, At the same time,It changed the attitude of nursing administrators to deal with adverse nursing events ,it help the administrators to seek for flaws and loopholes from the system more than the personal mistakes, and let the administrators to improve the system, strengthenthe system, to ensure safety and nursing quality.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Dr. Ismet Eser had finished her PhD in the department of internal diseases nursing in 1993. Prof. Dr. Eser, who had also 3-year experience as a nurse manager in eye clinic.. She has been studying at Ege University, Fundamentals of Nursing Departmant. She has more than 20 international papers and more than 80 paper national papers in journals.

Abstract:

This study was conducted to determine open system endotracheal suctioning knowledge and practice of the critical care nurses and to investigate relationship between defining characteristics and nurses’ knowledge and practices. The study was conducted through a cross-sectional and non-participant structured observational design between 2013 and 2014 in a teaching hospital in Western Turkey. The study sample included 72 nurses working at 3 adults ICUs. After the ethical approvals, data were collected using a 45-item structured and self-administered questionnaire and a 31-item onservational checklist. The questionnare and checklist were first sent to12 experts for assessment of content validity. In terms of reliability of the tools, a pilot study was undertaken. Descriptive and inferential statistics were utilized to analyze the data. The mean years of age of the nurses was 30,87 + 6,18, 75% of them were female and 65,3% had a Bachelor’s degree. The mean scores of knowledge and practice were 23,79 + 3,83 and 12,88 +2,53. The relationship between the type of intensive care unit and the nurses’ knowledge scores was statistically significant (Kruskal-Wallis x2=8,619, p= 0,013).This study suggests that most of the nurses’ knowledge level was good and practice level was fair. Intensive care nurses should perform suctioning procedure accurately in order to ensure delivery of quality of care and eliminate complications. It is very important to improve themselves by obtaining knowledge from diverse scientific sources continuously.

Speaker
Biography:

J-D Wagner has graduated from the University of South Africa (UNISA) in 2013 with a Master’s degree in Health Studies. He has functioned in both the public and private health sectors in South Africa, in the clinical nursing domain and is currently a Senior Lecturer at Ann Latsky Nursing College (Gauteng, South Africa).

Abstract:

This study aimed to establish and describe the level of communication satisfaction that professional nurses experience in selected public hospitals in the City of Johannesburg, South Africa. Quantitative, explorative and descriptive research was conducted to determine the communication effectiveness and levels of communication satisfaction. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, based on an adapted version of the Downs and Adrian (2004) Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ). A sample of 265 professional nurses, from different nursing categories, was chosen using a disproportionate random stratified sampling method. The study population consisted of three groups of professional nurses, namely nurse managers (n=18), operational managers (n=22) and professional nurses (n=90). Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency analysis: Item analysis was done to assess the reliability of the different dimensions or constructs in the questionnaire via Cronbach’s alpha values. The study highlighted areas of effective and ineffective communication, as well as areas of communication satisfaction and dissatisfaction, among professional nurses. The recommendations for the improvement of the communication effectiveness and communication satisfaction of PNs are aimed at creating an organisational atmosphere conducive to two-way communication.

Speaker
Biography:

Nuray Turan has completed her Ph.D at the age of 30 years from Istanbul University, Institute of Health Sciences. She is graduated from Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing. She is working at Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Department of Fundamentals of Nursing since 2005. Her areas of interest are intramuscular injection, complementary therapy, nursing informatics, nursing process and nursing care. Author and co-author of articles, books and other publications on fundamentals of nursing and leader of statutory research projects. She is member of Turkish Nurses Society, Nursing Education Society, and Graduates Florence Nightingale School of Nursing Society.

Abstract:

Although intramuscular injection is one of the nursing practices frequently performed by nurses, the knowledge of nurses on intramuscular injection sites and method is not sufficient and evidence-based. This study was conducted to determine the injection sites selected by nurses in intramuscular (IM) drug administration and the factors that affect the selection of site. Population of this descriptive cross-sectional study consists of 250 nurses who work at two private hospitals in Istanbul. Sample group of the study included 171 nurses (68.4% of the population), who were selected from said population using the stratified random sampling method. The data were collected through a questionnaire developed by the researchers, and frequency, percentage, minimum, maximum, mean, standard deviation and chi-square methods were used in the analysis of data. It was found that average age of the nurses is 26.27 (SS=7.46) years, average duration of professional experience is 68.96 (SS=84.53) months, average duration of experience in the unit is 32.78 (SS=38.41) months, majority of nurses in the first line (62.6%) are graduated vocational school of health, and they have worked in units like emergency, surgery, intensive care unit, obstetrics/delivery room, surgical units, pediatric, and polyclinic. It was also determined that 40.4% of nurses administer IM injection very frequently (more than 5 times a week), 83.6% of nurses firstly prefer dorsogluteal site for IM injection, 74.9% have not received a training on IM injection administration sites in recent times, 73.7% have not read any literature, but 76% can transfer their knowledge to practice. On the other hand, from among the nurses who stated that they recently received training on IM injection administration sites and read literature, 21.9% said that deltoid site is recommended for IM injection, 65.8% said laterofemoral site, 47.2% said ventrogluteal site, and 77.8% said dorsogluteal site. When the knowledge level of nurses on complications which may develop depending on the IM injection site was examined, it was observed that they know that a pain/discomfort develops in all administration sites but some do not develop; although there is a risk of nerve injury development in the deltoid site, considerable majority of them claim that nerve injury will not develop; although there is no risk of sciatic nerve damage development in the ventrogluteal site, some nurses stated otherwise; and although there is a risk of bone injury, vascular injury, infection, necrosis, tissue irritation, nodule or hardness, abscess and hematoma in all sites, some nurses do not report these complications as a risk. It was also found that variables such as age, professional education status and duration of experience of nurses do not affect selection of site in IM injection administration, but the unit where they work and duration of experience in that unit affect selection of site when administering IM injection. The nurses frequently prefer dorsogluteal site for administering IM injection, their knowledge about the complications which may develop in the sites they select for IM injection is insufficient, the unit where the nurses work and duration of experience in that unit affect their selection of site in IM injection administration.

Speaker
Biography:

Nurten Kaya is graduated from Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing in 1987. She completed her PhD from Istanbul University, Institute of Health Sciences. She worked at Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Department of Fundamentals of Nursing between from 1993 to 2013 and she has worked at the Health Sciences Faculty since 2013. Her areas of interest are intramuscular injection, complementary therapy, nursing informatics, nursing theories and models, nursing process and nursing care. Author and co-author of articles, books and other publications on fundamentals of nursing and leader of statutory research projects. She is member of Turkish Nurses Society, Nursing Education Society, and Graduates Florence Nightingale School of Nursing Society.

Abstract:

While administering medication through intramuscular injection, the ventrogluteal site must be used instead of the dorsogluteal site, and it is of great significance to locate the ventrogluteal site correctly. This was a cross-sectional study aimed at comparing and contrasting two methods (G and V method) for locating the ventrogluteal site, an IMI site. The study population comprised 120 randomly selected healthcare personnel at a university hospital. A two-part questionnaire was developed comprising 14 questions to collect relevant data. The first part contained questions about the socio-demographic characteristics of the respondents. The second part contained questions aimed at obtaining ventrogluteal site data acquired through ultrasonography. Written permission was obtained from the ethics committee and management board of the hospital as well as from the head of the department of radiodiagnosis. Participants were informed of the aim and benefits of the study and their roles in the study. The ventrogluteal site was determined using the geometric (G method) and V method and these sites were scrutinized under ultrasonography. It was investigated whether there was any anatomic vessels or neural structure present, and also determined the thickness of subcutaneous tissue, musculus gluteus medius, and musculus gluteus minimus. Of the participants, 65.8% were female and the average age was 32.30 years and body mass index was 25.31 kg/m2. The results showed that G and V methods were statistically significant in terms of variables. It was also found that sex affects subcutaneous tissue thickness and the skin-bone margin in the G and V method, and that body mass index determines subcutaneous tissue, musculus gluteus medius thickness and skin-bone margin. When the ventrogluteal site is used for intramuscular injection purposes, the site must be determined in line with the geometric method.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Saleh has completed his PhD on 2002 from the University of Kentucky . He is the director of Health Training Department at King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. He has published several papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Background: Nursing shortage caused recruitment of foreign nurses who has different educational background and different scope of practice, leading to non-standardized care and jeopardizing patient safety. Aim: The aim of this descriptive study is to train and assess nurses on generic competencies that are frequently used in their areas of clinical practice. Method: Train the trainer workshop was designed and conducted for six-generic competencies stations to assess 239 nurses who are engaged in the delivery of patient care at KAMC. Eighty-nine nurses were randomly selected to assess the impact of the competency training by pre-test post-test exams. At the completion of the competency assessment, participating nurses completed the competency fair satisfaction survey. Results: Eighteen percent of nurses failed the “Adult Physical Assessment” competency. About 18% of nurses failed the “Medication Administration” competency. Nurses scored the highest pass rate in the “Vital Signs” competency (96.19) and “Oxygen Therapy Administration” (93.62%). There was significant differences in means of pre-test and post-test in regard to the impact of competency training. The majority of nurses (87%) reported their satisfaction with the competency fair. Conclusion: Competency training and assessment in a multi-cultural institution is very paramount in standardizing patient care. Clinical educators must carry the responsibility of classifying nurses according to their competencies and plan developmental portfolio accordingly.

Speaker
Biography:

The authors are fresh graduate student nurses from the University of thePhilippines Manila who had an undergraduate research under the guidance of their professors: Professor Vanessa Manila-Maderal MA-HPS, RN and Dr. Cora A. Anonuevo, PhD, RN.

Abstract:

Through the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), TB-DOTS reached and sustained 100% nationwide coverage, achieving the global target for detection of new cases. NTP Manual of Procedures (MOP) enlists functions of health workers in TB-DOTS. Purpose: To determine the actual roles and activities of nurses in promoting medication adherence of patients under the TB-DOTS Program in District V, Manila. Methods: The study employed a descriptive exploratory design to gather baseline data on the actual roles and activities of nurses in promoting medication adherence. Eleven TB nurses were profiled and surveyed using a questionnaire drafted from the 2005 NTP MOP, 29 former TB patients (cured) were interviewed and a cohort of 723 TB case records were tabulated to determine the cure rate, treatment completion rate, and relapse rate for District V Manila. Descriptive statistics, content analysis, and data triangulation were performed and further analyzed using Williams et.al’s Self-Determination Model of Medication Adherence (1998). A pool of experts on TB-DOTS and health policies were consulted. Results: The current treatment success rate of 73% (n=600) in District V Manila did not meet the target National Treatment Success Rate of 90%. The computed cure rate is 26.55% (n=192), relapse rate of 1.24% (n=9), treatment completion rate of 56.43%. Conclusion: The roles and activities of nurses related to patients’ adherence to TB medications were deemed essential towards better TB patient outcomes. The study recommends further training of nurses for them to improve in carrying out the TB treatment regimen to improve patient adherence.

Speaker
Biography:

She had worked in the Internal Diseases Service of Ege University Medical Faculty Hospital in the years of 2008-2009, in the Oncology Clinic of Dokuz Eylul University Medical Faculty Hospital in the years of 2009-2011 and worked as a surgical nurse in the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty Hospital in the years of 2011-2014. She has been working as a lecturer in Cankiri Karatekin University. She graduated from the Psychiatry Nursing Master Programme of Adnan Menderes University Institute of Health Sciences in October 2015 and has been awarded the tittle of Specialist Nurse.

Abstract:

This study is conducted as a cross sectional research in order to investigate the depression,internet addiction and related factors in adolescents of high school students.It is targeted to reach 690 students.In the study,Personal Information Form,Beck Depression Scale and Internet Addiction Scale are used. In the evaluation of the data,descriptive statistics,test in unrelated measurements, Kruskall Wallis test,one way variance analysis are used. When the characteristics of adolescents of high school students who participated the survey are examined, it is found that 46.0% of the adolescents are women,30.6% of them study in 9th grade,30.9% of them are 17 years old,74.3% of them have internet connections in their homes. It is found that 21.1% of the adolescents has the risk of the depression, and this risk of depression increases in the ones with low income,the ones with insufficient pocket money,the ones with moderate relations with their siblings,the ones who face the attitude of authoritarian father,the ones with moderate relations with their mothers (Kw(2)=7.569;Kw(1)=27.524;Kw(1)=13.452;Kw(2)=7.349;Kw(1)=10.525;p<0.05 respectively),the ones with moderate school success,the ones with moderate relations with their teachers,the ones with moderate relations with their friends and the ones who have no close friends (Kw(1)=15.865;Kw(1)=18.625;Kw(1)=4.852;Kw(1)=5.731;p<0.05 respectively).It is found that 2.1% of the adolescents has showed limited symptoms in internet addiction and 0.4% of them are pathological internet users.It is found that the level of internet addiction was increased by being a male, studying in ninth grade,increasing age(t(667)=2.557;Kw=15.364; Kw=9,549;p<0.05 respectively). Moreover,it is found that the internet addiction is increased in the adolescents with insufficient pocket money(t(660)=2.673;p<0.05),the ones with fewer siblings,the ones with moderate relations with their siblings (Kw(2)=21.584;t(633)=3.120;p<0.05 respectively),in increased educational level of the father and authoritarian father attitudes of the father towards the adolescent (Kw(3)=5.750;Kw(2)=6.155;p<0.05 respectively).Still,it is found that it is increased in increased educational level of mother, when mother is employed and in the ones with moderate relations with their mothers(Kw(3)=12.546;t(667)=1.486;t(653)=3.449;p<0.05 respectively),the ones with moderate relations with their teachers and the ones with no close friends(t(637)=4.728; t(667)=2.580; p<0.05).

  • Healthcare
Speaker
Biography:

Helen Riess, M.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She directs the Empathy and Relational Science Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her research team conducts translational research utilizing the neuroscience of emotions. The effectiveness of Dr. Riess’s empathy education approach has been demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial. Dr. Riess has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and is an internationally recognized speaker and researcher. Her Empathy TEDx talk has been viewed by over 100,000 viewers. Her empathy training curricula are implemented internationally in healthcare. She is Chief Scientific Officer of Empathetics, Inc, providing web-based empathy training solutions.

Abstract:

The decline in empathy in healthcare has reached global proportions (Berwick Report, 2013) and highlights the need for evidence-based interventions. Ninety percent of nurses, physicians and hospital administrators endorsed the need for institutional empathy training in a recent Schwartz Center Survey. Professional empathy is correlated with patient safety, patient satisfaction, better health outcomes, and clinician wellbeing. Research shows that empathy for patients declines throughout medical training with increasing burnout in medical professionals. implicating up to 60% of nurses in the US. Patients are demanding humanistic care which is paramount to restoring the public’s trust in the medical profession. This presentation will highlight novel empathy research that demonstrates that empathy can be taught with sustainable behavior changes and our recent meta-analysis that demonstrated that relationship factors improved health outcomes such as obesity, asthma, diabetes, hypertension, and pulmonary infections. These interventions are closely tied to cost reduction. A multi-centered randomized controlled trial was conducted at a large general hospital to determine whether a novel neuroscience-based empathy training could improve clinician empathy at the level of patient perception. The training group showed significant improvement in patient ratings of empathy (p=.02). A brief series of three training sessions significantly improved clinicians’ empathic and relational skills as rated by their patients. The training has been translated into a web-based format for global accessibility. With patients deserving humanistic care from their healthcare institutions, we present a solution that offers a step towards systemic changes to improving compassionate care.

Speaker
Biography:

Werner Schuetze has finished law schhool at the university of Freiburg in germany before he studied medicine and became a Dr. med in 1981. He is a children and youth psychiatrist as well as for adults, studied family therapy and was educated in psychodynamic therapy as well as treatment of severe psychic traumas. As a head of a psychiatric department in Nauen/ Brandenburg/ Germany he implemented the finnish Open Dialogue Approach in his hospital. After retirement he is working as a trainer and supervisor in the education of Open Dialogue and connected projects in Germany, Poland , Italy and US

Abstract:

Open Dialogue is a post modern approach to severe crises in mental illness and has been developed in Finland since the early 80ties of the last century. Y. Alanen from the University of Turku together with his team created the Need Adapted Treatment Approach, which later has been further developed mainly by Jaakko Seikkula and the team of the Keropoudas Hospital in Tornio in Western Lappland. It promotes an early intervention by involving the family and the network of a patient at once, uses best practices of systemic therapies, integrates other professions and peers, uses low dose medication and shared decision making within the network. It is a very comprehensive change in organizational aspects of the treatment system going along with it. It needs a different way of financing and reduces inpatient treatment in the long run. And that is where the risks are: Medication is not at the core interest any more, we prefer a low dose, intervall treatment as short as possible. We also know, that the relation to the psychiatrist has in influence on the dose needed.Outpatient treatment is vastly in favor, hospitals would have to close beds, doctors , psychologists and nurses are no longer the all knowing persons, everybody is an expert of his own life. People interested in this approach gather in the annual meeting of “The International Network For The Treatment of Psychosis”, founded in 1996. Participants come mainly from scandinavian countries and Finland, Germany, Poland, Lithuania and nowadays from the UK and ths US:

Speaker
Biography:

Eileen Savage is a Chair in Nursing at the School of Nursing & Midwifery, University College Cork, Ireland. Her primary research interests relate to chronic illness management across the lifespan. She has conducted a number of funded commissioned reports, systematic reviews and studies relating to chronic illness management. She has published widely in the international literature and is on the Editorial Board of Chronic illness. She leads a research cluster on chronic illness management at University College Cork and has developed strong collaborative interdisciplinary research relationships both nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

Evidence from the international literature is that the prevention and management of chronic diseases through integrated care should be primary care GP led supported by primary care specialists and secondary care specialist services. Primary care led services towards integrated care marks a shift away from hospital centric services, which has traditionally dominated healthcare in many countries including Ireland. The shift towards primary care led services is now a strategic priority at Government level in an effort to tackle the growing burden of chronic disease. The emphasis on integrated care is to avoid fragmentation of services between primary and secondary care and to ensure the delivery of “the right service, at the right time, in the right place by the right team”. In this paper, the evidence on how best to support a national approach to primary care led services within a model of integrated care for chronic disease prevention and management is examined. The features of a well-designed model of care that contribute to improved clinical, process and service utilization outcomes will be presented. The implications and related challenges for implementation will be considered with application to Ireland. Lessons learned from other countries will inform this discussion.

Weichang Du

University of New Brunswick, Canada

Title: Personal health services framework
Speaker
Biography:

Weichang Du has been a Professor in Computer Science at University of New Brunswick, Canada since 1991. He obtained his MSc and PhD in Computer Science from University of Victoria, Canada in 1985 and 1991. In past 25 years, he has published many research articles and supervised more than 50 Master’s and PhD students. In recent years, he has been conducting research on designing and developing knowledge-based and intelligent software and knowledge systems and applications on Web and mobile platforms, including health related systems and applications.

Abstract:

The Personal Health Services Framework (PHSF) is a general framework of online services for healthcare providers and individual patients to connect through the internet using their mobile devices and computers, for establishing and configuring healthcare related applications. Using the services, through their mobile devices or computers, individual patients can communicate and coordinate with their healthcare providers to report their daily self-health monitoring data from their personal health monitoring devices and receive healthcare related instructions and advices and healthcare providers can view and analyze reported personal health monitoring data from individual patients and effectively diagnose patients’ health information and provide patients further instructions and advices on one-to-one basis. The framework also provides location-aware and context-aware services, for individual patients to seek nearby healthcare providers during travelling to different places in order to receiving timely healthcare services. The context-aware services can intelligently monitoring and analyze individual patients’ health situations and trigger corresponding actions such as timely informing patients’ healthcare providers, nearby hospitals or medical emergency services. The services provided by PHSF are fully pluggable and configurable. Customized specific healthcare applications involving individual patients and their healthcare providers can be created. Multiple customized healthcare applications with multiple patients and healthcare providers can operate simultaneously using the services. The framework is implemented by four layers of services and multiple databases on the internet.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: To explore three school based transitions and their impact on positive Self- Reported- Health (SRH), pre-school to elementary school (6–10 y), elementary school to junior high school (10-13y), and junior high school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16y), in a long-term longitudinal population based study. Methods: The study followed three cohorts through one school transition each. A longitudinal study with data from 6693 children and their Health Dialogue Questionnaires© were used. Data were collected in the middle of Sweden during 2007–2012 with school children age 6–16 years old. Results: Several significant factors were identified impacting the positive SRH among children age 6-16y; not feeling sad or depressed, afraid or worried, positive school environment (schoolyard and restrooms), not bullied, good sleep, daily physical activity and ability to concentrate. There was no single factor identified, the factors differed according to gender and age. Conclusion: The study has identified several gender and age specific factors for successful school transitions relevant for a positive SRH. This is valuable information for school staff, parents and school children and provides a possibility to provide support and assistance when needed.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Hecker Fernandes has been a nurse for 26 years. Her background includes neontal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, open heart newborn, flight nurse, and currenlty a clinical ssitant professor at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, College of Nursing. She worked in coordination with the Dean of the College to develop a clinical immersion experience in El Salvador with the goal of promtoing leadership and community health care skills as well cultural biliteracy.

Abstract:

This presentation describes a community health clinical experienced by undergraduate nursing students in El Salvador. It allows them to develop relationships with locals, specifically the homeless people who visit “Casa Esperanza” or Hope House. Recent studies have found a lack of support networks for people who are homeless, leading to isolation and loneliness. 33-38% of homeless people spend the day either with other homeless people or alone. Isolation erodes people’s resiliency and ability to cope. Homeless men and women lack basic amenities; they hope to have food to eat when hungry but they also need to be treated as human beings. Casa Esperanza is in San Miguelitito, one of many neighborhoods still affected by the civil war. The people who were not able to leave were forced to live in the streets. At Casa Esperanza, the students prepare and serve meals, talk with the clients, and perform clinical consults. In Fall of 2015, 24 consults were performed, providing various treatments: reading glasses for severe cataracts, vitamins, herbal remedies for sleep, relaxation exercises and much more. Often the clients lack human connection; the students created a client experience that shows respect for the clients, treating them as the person they are.

Speaker
Biography:

Erin Shankel was prepared as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) at Vanderbilt University in 2003 and proceeded to earn her DNP at Belmont University in 2014. She is an associate professor and interim FNP track director at Belmont Unitversity. Additionally, she maintains her clinical practice at East Nashville Family Medicine treating urgent care needs of the local community. Her research interests include compassion fatigue, pediatric asthma self-management, and symptom management theory.

Abstract:

Nurse educators have long strived to produce competent, compassionate graduates. However, those who are the most compassionate may also be at the highest risk for developing compassion fatigue. In our School of Nursing, and in the broader College of Health Sciences, we have begun an initiative to proactively develop self-care habits among our students, thereby preventing compassion fatigue before they ever enter the workforce. Nurses and other health care professionals find themselves witnessing and partnering in the profound joys and sadnesses of life along with their patients. The cumulative effects of these encounters can result in feelings of frustration, powerlessness, and diminished morale. In short, these clinicians are left “running on empty”. As a result, they may ultimately leave the profession. A 2012 study showed that 29.6% of turnover could be attributed to compassion fatigue. The nursing profession cannot afford to lose the most compassionate among us to compassion fatigue; neither can our patients. Although only recently studied, several interventions for preventing compassion fatigue are emerging in the literature. Some of these include mindfulness, self-care, self-reflection, and careful work-life balance. Ironically, although most nurses are giving, caring people but find it hard to nurture themselves. It occurs to us as faculty that it might be possible to teach our students these compassion fatigue strategies, thereby equipping them for a long, productive, and fulfilling career in the field. Nursing, OT, PT, and social work students may attend sessions on subjects such as mindfulness, meditation, and early identification of compassion fatigue symptoms.

Speaker
Biography:

Malin Rising Holmström has completed her Ph.D. in 2013 at Mid Sweden University and has started her Postdoctoral studies in 2015. Malin Rising Holmström has long experience from clinical work associated with children´s health. Lisbeth Kristiansen is a senior lecture at Mid Sweden University and has a long experience of research concerning different aspects of health among children and adults.

Abstract:

Background: To explore three school based transitions and their impact on positive Self- Reported- Health (SRH), pre-school to elementary school (6–10 y), elementary school to junior high school (10-13y), and junior high school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16y), in a long-term longitudinal population based study. Methods: The study followed three cohorts through one school transition each. A longitudinal study with data from 6693 children and their Health Dialogue Questionnaires© were used. Data were collected in the middle of Sweden during 2007–2012 with school children age 6–16 years old. Results: Several significant factors were identified impacting the positive SRH among children age 6-16y; not feeling sad or depressed, afraid or worried, positive school environment (schoolyard and restrooms), not bullied, good sleep, daily physical activity and ability to concentrate. There was no single factor identified, the factors differed according to gender and age. Conclusion: The study has identified several gender and age specific factors for successful school transitions relevant for a positive SRH. This is valuable information for school staff, parents and school children and provides a possibility to provide support and assistance when needed.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Eze was Director, University of Winnipeg’s Global College “Institute for Health and Human Potential”; Coordinator, “Biochemistry Program”; and Director, “Summer Institute in Diseases and Policy.” As a Health-enhancement Biochemist, he is engaged in laboratory and interdisciplinary research addressing well-being, disease surveillance and interventions from a multi-/cross-/inter-disciplinary standpoint, with experts in the various areas. The diseases vary from infections (malaria, HIV/AIDS, etc.), to chronic conditions. He explores the role of reactive oxygen, nitric oxide, and other chemical commonalities, and seeks herbal and other remedies, for optimal public health.

Abstract:

The biochemical basis for sustaining good health lies mainly in continued consumption of fresh foods and clean air. Thus we are able to maintain homeostasis: Keeping our internal chemistry optimally stable. Homeostatic imbalance spells ill-health. Many diseases are associated with inflammation: stimulation of the immune system. Inflammation leads to production of copious amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) yielding oxidative stress (OS). OS causes oxidation of cellular DNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates etc. Accumulation of oxidized forms causes aging, cancer, degenerative diseases, and death. Thus, inflammation and homeostasis are at the core of Health and Wellness. We therefore recognize unique chemical species and biochemical principles serving as common denominators in diseases and health. Intervention strategies targeted towards these commonalities are warranted, especially for Indigenous peoples (as in Canada) who rely on traditional remedies. Herbal resources provide antioxidants and other phytochemicals, producing healing outcomes towards good health. Our work has revealed the role of herbal antioxidants in quelling OS and installing wellness. The common denominators connect the diseases: Infectious to chronic (e.g., Human papilloma virus to cancers) and chronic to chronic (e.g., diabetes and its complications). The herbal phytochemicals also deal with infectious agents. For example, Neem plant (Azdirachta indica) extracts cure many ailments including malaria. Recently, Neem antimalarial principles have been formulated into the antimalarial capsule “IRACARP” by ROCITUS IJU International Ltd in Nigeria. This success story of harnessing local Indigenous resources should inspire similar bold steps against other ailments, for instance diabetes using Indigenous Canadian Labrador Tea (Rhododendron groenlandicum) and other herbs.

Speaker
Biography:

Tamar Jacob, PT, MPH, PhD, is a registered physitherapist. She has completed her master's and PhD degrees in public health from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She is the head of the Masters' program at the Physiotherapy Department in Ariel University, Israel. She has published more than 30 papers in peer review journals and has been serving as the editor of the Journal of The Israeli Physiotherapy Society. She has been engaged in education of physiotherapy students for over thirty years. Her present main research areas are education in physiotherapy and physiotherapy services in Israel.

Abstract:

To date no research has described Israeli Physical Therapy (PT) services to determine whether they are provided in the spirit intended by the National Health Care Law (NHCL). This study aimed to assess the equality, accessibility, and availability of PT services in Israel. Qualitative research was based on semi-structured personal interviews with all national directors of PT services in Israel, followed by content analysis of the data obtained. According to the findings, PT services are provided by all HMOs throughout Israel. In peripheral areas, access to services is limited; availability of services at most clinics is poor, aspect problem which is solved mainly by referring patients to PT outsourcing. The number of treatment sessions are determined by the NHCL, however, all directors agreed that the number of treatments should be a professional decision following patient evaluation and progress, rather than by administrative considerations. Inequality of service to peripheral areas could be reduced by creating cooperation between HMOs, thereby establishing clinics capable of providing accessible and equitable services. In addition, the number of sessions provided to patients in the health-care basket should be reassessed and a set of uniform criteria should be created for determining the optimal number of PT sessions. This could lead to greater uniformity in distribution of PT services provided by the HMOs.

Speaker
Biography:

Rupesh Kumar Pati has completed his PhD from IIT Roorkee, India on Sustainable Supply Chain (focus on paper industry) and is a Gold Medalist during his Masters at Indian School of Mines. He is Associate Professor at IIM Kozhikode, Kerala India. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals like OMEGA, IJPE, JPSM, IJPHM, IJLM etc. He has been serving as a reviewer of number of top journals like EJOR, IJPE, JCP, Journal of Cleaner Production, Resource conservation and Recycling etc. His current research interests are in the area application oriented studies on Green Business, GrSCM and Sustainability in Pharmaceutical.

Abstract:

The effect of industrializing has challenged the healthcare industry, where various new diseases like Anthrax, Bird flu, Ebola etc. Researches in these countries have found significant presence of expired drugs in Solid Waste Management (SWM). These pollute air, water and soil through incineration, seepage to river/water table and land filling. The exposure to these expired drugs (unknowingly) over a longer period negatively impact the immune system. The presence of large number of drug manufacturers (developing similar drugs under different brand) especially in developing nation (with less stricter regulations) allows flooding of drugs at retail/pharmacy. Hence, the need for effective disposal of large quantity of drugs (3-5% in India). The production of these excess drugs requires lot of water (as input) and discharging certain dangerous chemical byproducts. This leads to increased cost as-well-as pollution during production, transportation; and on expiry reverse logistics, disposal process. Hence, prices of drugs in the market are increased (as claimed by manufacturer during our focus group interaction). This increase makes the drug unaffordable to certain market segment/patients (especially in developing and under developed countries where Out of Pocket expenses are common) with poor public healthcare and insurance mechanism. All the above, challenges the basic business model of Healthcare sector on “sustainability framework” adversely affecting society, environment and economic of various stakeholders. The basic research question in this study is to provide inputs to policy formulation on: how to make the healthcare sector more sustainable: with easy accessibility of drugs at low cost (social), minimum wastages through expiry (environmental) and providing profit to the manufacturer to encourage him to invest in future needs?

Speaker
Biography:

Xianhong Li, RN, Ph.D. is an associate professor and the vice dean for research in Xiangya Nursing School of Central South University. She has received research training in Yale School of Nursing from 2007-2008, and in UCLA in USA from 2014-2015. She has been the PIs for 5 projects from different funding resources. She has published 17 articles with 7 indexed in SCI journals. In 2009, she got the Ray Wu Prize of Excellence to graduate students of life sciences in USA; in 2010 she got the third prize of Science and Technology Progress Award in Hunan Province of China.

Abstract:

The HIV prevalence among Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) is on a rapid increase during recent years. Successfully reducing high risk sexual behaviors of MSM is an important strategy for controlling the HIV epidemic. In some parts of the world, motivational interviewing (MI) has shown effectiveness in reducing unprotected anal intercourse, but the feasibility and effectiveness of MI has not been evaluated among Chinese MSM. This randomized control pilot study aimed to test the feasibility of Motivational Interviewing (MI) in reducing high-risk sexual behaviors among MSM in Changsha, China. Eighty MSM were randomly assigned to either the MI group, where participants received a three-session MI intervention over 4 weeks, or the control group, where participants received usual counseling from peer educators. High-risk behavior indicators and HIV knowledge level were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after intervention. The results showed that MI significantly improved consistent anal condom use in the MI group compared to everyone at baseline (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 1.63-20.2). However, there was no significant change in consistent condom use for oral sex or number of sexual partners between the two groups over time. The average HIV knowledge score improved equally in both groups over time (P=0.06). This study demonstrates that an intervention using MI was feasible and partially effectiveness among MSM in China in increasing condom use. However, the sustainability of MI to improve consistent condom use among MSM in China needs to be evaluated in further.

Speaker
Biography:

Erhabor Osaro is a Chartered Scientist and Fellow of the Institute of Biomedical Science of London. He holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Immunohematology. He completed the University of Greenwich Specialist Training in Blood Transfusion and Laboratory Quality Management System. His teaching experience spans both Nigeria and the United Kingdom. He is a recipient of several awards including the famous British Blood Transfusion Society young scientist award and the Margaret Kenwright young scientist award. He is a registration portfolio verifier/examiner for the Institute of Biomedical Science of London. He is the author of 4 scientific books and 5 chapters of scientific books. He is a Member of the Editorial Board as well as an article reviewer to several International Scientific Journals. A well published contributor with more than 100 published articles in the field of Infectious Diseases, Immunohematology and Transfusion Medicine. His work now spans the connected research themes of hematology, immunology, transfusion science, tropical infectious disease and breast cancer.

Abstract:

The National Health Service (NHS) is a term used to describe the publicly funded healthcare delivery system providing quality healthcare services in the United Kingdom. There are several challenges militating against the effective laboratory service delivery in the NHS in England. Biomedical scientists work in healthcare to diagnose disease and evaluate the effectiveness of treatment through the analysis of body fluids and tissue samples from patients. They provide the “engine room” of modern medicine with 70% of diagnosis based on the laboratory results generated by them. This review involved the search of literature for information on working condition of biomedical scientist in the NHS in England. Laboratory service delivery in the NHS in England faces numerous daunting challenges; staffing levels in the last few years have become dangerously low, less remunerated, relatively less experienced and predominantly band 5's, multidisciplinary rather than specialty based, associated with working more unsocial hours without adequate recovery time, de-banding of staff, high staff turnaround, profit and cost driven rather than quality. These factors has resulted in burn out, low morale, high sickness absences, increased error rate, poor team spirit, diminished productivity and suboptimal laboratory service delivery. There is the urgent need to retract our steps on unpopular policies to ensure that patient care is not compromised by ensuring adequate staffing level and mix, ensuring adequate remuneration of laboratory staff, implementing evidenced-based specialty oriented service, determining the root cause/s for the high staff turnover and implementing corrective action, identifying other potential sources of waste in the system rather than pruning the already dangerously low staffing levels and promoting a quality delivery side by side cost effectiveness.

Speaker
Biography:

Derya ADIBELLİ has completed her PhD in 2014 from Ataturk University and Postdoctoral studies from Adnan Menderes University Soke Health High School. She is assistant professor and the Assistant Director of Soke Health High School. She has been working on public health nursing, geriatrics, heart health in women and domestic violence. She has published articles in (inter)national journals, presentations at (inter)national congresses, chapters in books. She has membership in various scientific associations/societies and has been an Editorial Board Member of an international journal.

Abstract:

The average length of life in societies has increased with the increase in the level of welfare, which in turn led to a rise in the rate of the older people in the general population. As a result of these demographic changes with respect to the increase in the average lifespan, restrictions occur in the daily care activities of individuals, and older people require more social, economic and health protection as well as better nursing care on various levels. In geriatric patient care, as in all age groups, nurses obtain patient’s health history, determine his/her needs, develops a comprehensive care plan, provides treatment and care and evaluates the results. While carrying all these tasks through and fulfilling their responsibilities, nurses experience several problems and difficulties in patient care in their work environment. The difficulties experienced by nurses in geriatric patient care include the inadequacy of physical conditions and technical equipment in hospitals, care problems experienced due to patients’ physical restrictions, administrative difficulties, communication problems experienced with the patient or family caregiver, difficulties arising from insufficient knowledge, skills and experience in geriatric patient care, prejudice of older patients and family caregivers toward hospital environment and health personnel and not being appreciated for the care given to patients. These problems and difficulties experienced by nurses give rise to an increase in workforce loss, care moves and job suspension as well as in early retirement rates among nurses, a decrease in work efficiency, delays in returns to work, and an increase in medical treatment costs. Additionally, nurses experience physical problems and psychosocial problems due to the difficulties they faced in geriatric patient care. Realizing and solving these difficulties will enable nurses to be more satisfied with their job and thus enable them to provide patients with a more satisfactory care service.

Speaker
Biography:

Sun Xiao has completed her MD from Tongji University, Shanghai, China. She mainly works at the chronic management. She has published more than 10 papers in Chinese reputed journals and one SCI.

Abstract:

Background: In present, the incidence rates on chronic diseases increase every year across the world. The chronic diseases lead to physical / psychological injury and economic losses. So it is necessary to make effective measures to improve healthcare outcomes. Process: 10 healthcare groups of chronic diseases in the field of diabetes, stroke, peritoneal dialysis and others were established. The survey included KAP and demands investigation of patients/ family caregivers; intervention measures for improving healthcare outcomes, such as follow-up, health education, extended care and others. For example, diabetes nursing group had established: 1) health management system for recording blood glucose every time, for monitoring dynamically daily trends and average value; 2) health education turntable for providing standardization education of 5 to 10 minutes; 3) monitor network based on the mode of Hospital - Community - Patients; 4) E mode of diabetes management, that is: building archives-periodically measuring blood sugar-remote-monitoring-actively healthcare-providing health education. Stroke nursing group opened the outpatient clinics for screening risk factors when stroke happening, carried out various of health education methods (such as Micro Message Public Platform, rehabilitation App, etc), and instructed the post-strokes’ early rehabilitation exercise according to the standardized flowchart. Peritoneal dialysis nursing group developed the "health education prescription" and "Family Visit Form". Health education group built the “Community Health Education School”, and surveyed the community nurses on the training demand for theory knowledge and practice skills, investigate the chronic patients on the health education demand, the purpose of which were to build the operating model of community health education school including training classes and methods of community nurses, health education curriculum and education forms of chronic patients, etc. Results: Completion rate of follow-up reached to 63.5%. Percent of using insulin pen incorrect dropped from 61.7% to 12.5%. Complications related to stroke falling from 38.8% to 15.5%, readmission rate from 40% to 27.5%. Patients’ satisfaction was as high as 98%.We finished 50 times health education classes, 27 times community activities covering 5 districts and more than 3000 community residents came to join us. Awareness rate of health knowledge was more than 80%. Conclusion: Patients having chronic diseases received extended care, will effectively improve healthcare outcome including complication rates, readmission rates, awareness rates of health knowledge, health behavior compliance, etc.

Speaker
Biography:

Sheri Brynard is a 30 year-old South African lady from Bloemfontein who is living with Down syndrome. She has set new boundaries for people with Down syndrome by qualifying as an assistant-teacher in a public school and becoming a motivational speaker nationally and internationally. She became the first, and still is, the only person in South Africa with Down syndrome who has received a tertiary qualification when she graduated from the National Technical College in Bloemfontein. This qualification followed after she was also the first child with Down syndrome, 23 years ago, to attend and successfully graduate from a mainstream school. Sheri was chosen by Down Syndrome South Africa (DSSA) to become their ambassador and also serves as ambassador on the international Down syndrome board. She was also awarded the highest prestige award from the South African Down Syndrome Association for the highest academic achievement received by a person with Down syndrome in South Africa.

Abstract:

With this presentation, an Afrikaans speaking woman of 33 will inform the meeting in English or Afrikaans how she grew up as a girl with Down syndrome in South Africa. She will explain how her determination to make the best if her situation helped her to cope with her disability and how she, with the help of her parents, handled the preconceived ideas of the people of her time. She will illustrate how a sense of humour and positive outlook on life helped her to achieve against all odds. She made the words and the philosophy of Nelson Mandela “you are the master of your destiny and you are the captain of your soul“, her own life philosophy. She truly believes that one must never focus on what you don’t have, but be proud of who you are. She strongly believes one must work hard to make the best of who you are. Shéri Brynard gives meaning to her life by trying to change people’s perceptions about people with Down syndrome in South Africa and abroad. She also tries to help the so called normal people who listen to her to focus on the positive things in their own lives. The central idea is that anyone has the potential to become a leader in the field where that person can make a difference, if you use every opportunity to the best of your ability. A legacy is cultivated by making the best of your situation, whatever it may be rising above your constraints by striving for excellence and working hard to realise your true potential. A leader inspires others to do the same and does not give up hope, ever. This is what Sheri Brynard did.

Speaker
Biography:

Ching-Min Chen has received her Doctor of Nursing Science (Health Policy and Health of the Community) in 1995 from Indiana University, USA. She has joined Taipei Medical University as a Lecturer shortly after her return. She was promoted to full Professor in 2007. She has served as Deputy Director of Nursing Services Department of the University Hospital in 2003-2004 and Director of the School of Geriatric Nursing and Care Management in 2007-2011. In 2011, she relocated and took her position as Professor in Department of Nursing, National Cheng Kung University and Adjunct Professor, both at the Institute of Gerontology and Institute of Allied Health.

Abstract:

Population ageing and the increasing of longevity associating with chronic diseases in old age are crucial issues around the world. While providing community-based primary care services, public health nurses (PHNs) have faced the increased demands in providing comprehensive and continuity of care for community dwelling elderly with chronic conditions. The objective of this study was to analyze PHNs’ perceptions of empowerment and practice in chronic disease management in Southern Taiwan. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used. A purposive sample of PHNs from four public health centers in Southern Taiwan participated in focus group discussion and completed the questionnaire survey. PHNs reported highest in communication followed by disease care and management in practice of chronic disease management. Perception of empowerment in chronic disease management showed PHNs felt as a nature to agree in psychological empowerment and about 50% felt the organizational empowerment. Practice in chronic disease management was correlated with empowerment. Four themes were emerged based on the result of the focus group: "Gather and Collect Community", "Between Ideal and Reality", "Seamless Integration and Well Considered in Every Aspect: The Demands from Individual, Organization to Environment", and "Blueprint for a Better Chronic Disease Management". It is recommended that PHNs should keep the original care services and provide service through developing partnerships, strengthened the training, building up medical information networks, apply smart ways or tools, combine with related of resources and promote policies to support PHNs in chronic care management.

Speaker
Biography:

Hema Malini has completed her Master and PhD level in nursing from Monash University, Australia. She just graduated for her PhD in the early of this year 2016. She work sas a senior lecturer in Faculty of Nursing, University of Andalas, one of the leading university in Indonesia. Her works mostly in the chronic disease management has been published in two international journal such as Collegian. Her continuing passion in developing an excelllent care for chronic disease management will continue for long time in the future.

Abstract:

Aims. To describe the process development of group-based diabetes education program in the Indonesian context. Background. People with diabetes need significant knowledge and skills in managing their disease. Evidence has shown that an effective way to increase the knowledge of people with diabetes to enable them to perform good self-management is through a structured health education program. However, such a program has hardly implemented in developing countries. In this present study, the process of developing such a program is described, focusing primarily on two main aspects of the study: the development and implementation. Findings. Overall, throughout the course of the program, some changes in diabetes knowledge, self-care activities, and glycaemic blood level (HbA1c) were observed. It was found that there were some misperceptions in diabetes management in patients prior to attending the program. Experience in attending and being involved in the program was explored and several benefits were identified. These benefiteincluded improved knowledge and confidence in diabetes management. Conclusion. The application of the program benefitted patients and health professionals in terms of improving knowledge and skills. It also had a positive impact in terms of the experience it gave to those involved in the program.This study demonstrated that a structured group-based education program can work in the Indonesian setting and can bring short-term improvement to both people with diabetes as well asbenefit the health professionals involved.

Hatice Simsek

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Title: Internalized stigma of tuberculosis patients
Speaker
Biography:

Hatice Simsek has completed her Master’s degree from Istanbul University, Public Health Department. She is currently a PhD Student at Ege University Nursing Faculty, Department of Public Health Nursing.

Abstract:

Tuberculosis affects not only the physical aspect but also the social and psychological on patients. This social dimension of tuberculosis and tuberculosis pose a significant problem for patients. This study aimed to determine internalized stigma of tuberculosis patients. The universe of the descriptive research has established a definite diagnosis of tuberculosis patients (n=202) is registered in the Manisa Central Tuberculosis Dispensary, 2007-2012 in treated/undergoing treatment in which the residents of Manisa central. The sample of the study consisted of 83 patients that meet the criteria for participating (n=83). Survey participation rate was 84.3%. Permission institutions and ethics committee approval received for research, data were collected using Tuberculosis Patients Stigma Scale (Cronbach's alpha=0.79) with a face to face interview technique from March to August 2012. Data was assessed using frequency, percentage, mean, t-test, Pearson's correlation and Man Whitney U test in SPSS 15.00 for Windows program. The average age of the participants 47.11±14.43; 65.7% were male; 51.4% of primary school graduates; the 72.9% were married and 85.7% social security. 82.9% of patients completed their treatment; 94.3% of tuberculosis patients had no other family. 37.1% of TB patients are not told anyone that. The results shows that faced with the stigma of tuberculosis, the intermediate scores obtained from the scale (mean score 70.01). In this study that conducted to evaluate the stigma of TB patients, which detected no significant relationship between stigma and age, marital status, employment status, the longest living place, education, social security, treatment continuation condition, no other disease except TB and regular examination status; just to mention a significant relationship between stigma and tell the disease status and sex.

Speaker
Biography:

Yabin Shang has graduated from Southern Medical University (former First Military Medical University) in 2013. After completion of graduation, she has worked as an Assistant Nurse at Nanfang Hospital affiliated to Southern Medical University. She is currently a Graduate Student at Beijing University of Chinese Medicine.

Abstract:

Objective: To investigate the relationship between Perceived Social Supports (PSS) and quality of life in liver transplant recipients. Methods: Using Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) to investigate the social support in liver transplant recipients and Chinese version of post liver transplant quality of life instrument (pLTQ) to investigate their quality of life. PLTQ, a specific questionnaire to investigate the quality of life in patients after liver transplantation was developed by Saab (2011) and was introduced to China by Xiao Peng (2014). Pearson correlation was used to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support and the patients’ quality of life. Results: 246 patients was selected using convenience sampling in the outpatient department in one general hospital in Beijing. The average age of the patients were 53.72 and 187 (75.70%) patients were male. The average score of each pLTQ item was 5.373±1.103. The average score of PSSS was 5.589±1.007, significant others were 5.394±1.186, family was 6.074±1.050 and friends support was 5.282±1.357. Pearson correlation has shown that friends’ support was correlated with pLTQ’s each domain. Besides financial domain, significant others’ support was also correlated with PSSS’s every domain. Family’s support was correlated with pLTQ’s four domains except financial and complication domain. Discussion: Family’s support was the highest among the three domains of PSSS. PSS was significantly correlated with the quality of life in patients after liver transplantation. Among which, friends’ support was correlated with pLTQ’s each domain.

Speaker
Biography:

Ayşe Beşer completed her Doctorate in 2003 and assumed the title of Associate Professor in 2008 and Professor in 2014. She worked as an Associate Dean and Head of the Department of public health in Dokuz Eylül University Faculty of Nursing. She has written 26 research articles that have been published in international indexes and presides the occupational health association in Turkey.

Abstract:

As tuberculosis is both a common and social disease, it causes individuals to fail in easily expressing their disease in society, remain in the background, get stigmatized and labeled in society. This study was aimed at evaluating the views of individuals living in urban areas of Turkey regarding tuberculosis. This qualitative study was conducted between April-May, 2015. The target population of the study consisted of healthy individuals living in the Region of Balçova and totally 26 individuals aged 18 and older without tuberculosis were included in the study by using the criterion sampling method. The data were collected via the Information Form of Socio-Demographic Features that was developed by the researchers and the semi-structured question form with totally 11 questions that was assessed by three experts for the purpose of evaluating the views of individuals regarding tuberculosis. Totally four focus group interviews with 5-6 participants were conducted by two researchers (one observer and one moderator). The interviews were recorded on tape and they were maintained until no new concept or different statement was obtained regarding the research subject and the data collection process was terminated when the data reached the saturation point. The data were analyzed by using the content analysis technique. According to the findings acquired from this study, two main themes were obtained as information about the disease and attitudes and behaviors of society. The participants stated that they did not exactly know the reasons of tuberculosis and the only information they had had been acquired from the environment. Majority of participants stated that they kept away from patients with tuberculosis. They were observed to display behaviors like avoiding sharing the same environment with patients, eating with them, kissing them, hugging them and working in the same environment with them. The employers also abstained from employing them.

Speaker
Biography:

Tcheunkeu Ebanga Nadine is a Bachelor degree holder in Nursing. She work with the Catholic Health Organization, Cameroon as a Nurse

Abstract:

Background: Initiating HIV+ patients on ART require lifelong commitment to treatment. Nurses are the first health care workers these patients meet in the hospital and thus failure for nurses to establish a cordial relationship with these clients can lead to refusal to start treatment and more especially stopping treatment by patients who have started. Stopping treatment at anytime will lead to increase morbidity and mortality. Rational: This study sought to bring out the importance of good nurse patient relationship in reducing loss to follow-up and enhancing patients’ adherence to treatment. Methodology: Four hospitals were use for this study which included to public hospitals and two religious hospitals. Data was then collected for 12 months comparing the rate of adherence of patients on ART in mission hospitals and that of patients on public hospitals. The study lasted for 12 months and a total of 450 naïve clients were enrolled on ART from all 4 hospitals at the start of the study. Results: Out of these 450 patients seen at the start of the studies 300 (66.7%) was coming from the public hospitals while 150 (33.3%) was the number of patients seen by the mission hospital. A six months survey was conducted to assess how many of the patients in both sites were still coming regularly for their follow up and refills. It was noticed that in the public hospitals they still had 200 i.e., 66.7% patients coming regularly while the mission sites still had 110(73.3%) faithful clients. The last survey was done after 12 months on the same sites considering the same number that is 450 clients which were enrolled in the study at the very beginning. There was no doubt that the public hospitals still had more lost to follow-up cases than the mission as they had lost another 30 clients leaving them with 120. Hence their total loss to follow up clients was 180 patients while the mission settings had lost more 15 clients so their total loss to follow-up clients came up to 55 patients. Conclusion: The public hospitals loss more patients on ART than the mission hospitals they loss up to 180 patients making it a percentage loss of 60 while the mission just recorded a percentage loss of 36.7. It was so because the mission nurses played a key role as they are more welcoming and caring due to their strong religious affiliation that makes them more empathetic and comforting than their counterparts of the public settings. Nurses have a vital role in making patients stick to ARTs.

  • Nursing types

Session Introduction

Maureen P Cardoza

New York Institute of Technology, USA

Title: Palliative care, hope and advanced illness management (AIM)
Speaker
Biography:

Maureen P Cardoza is currently a nursing professor at the New York Institute of Technology. She is a national and international speaker at nursing and educational conferences and is a recipient of numerous grants that include Gerontology nursing, human simulation, nursing curriculum design and nursing education strategies. Her areas of research interest and professional publications include High Fidelity Human Simulation, Neurobiology of learning, self-efficacy, orthopedic joint replacements, quality of life, aging, cancer survivorship, palliative care and bereavement. She is on the Editorial Board for the interprofessional journal Gerontology and Palliative Care and is a reviewer for the nursing journals International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship and Computer, Informatics, Nursing (CIN)

Abstract:

This session will explore the role of hope and the clinician as a palliative care provider for persons and their families living with advanced illnesses. Advanced illness management requires a comprehensive team approach for people with serious chronic illness such as heart failure, kidney disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Palliative care teams coordinate the transition from curative treatment toward end-of-life care optimizing the quality of life in chronic illness and nursing management.

Dian Baker

California State University, USA

Title: Partnerships to prevent non-ventilator pneumonia
Speaker
Biography:

Dian Baker, PhD, APRN, is a Professor at the School of Nursing and volunteer clinical faculty in pediatrics at University of California Davis Medical Center. She obtained her PhD from University of Hawaii and completed a Post-doctoral fellowship at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at the University of California, Davis. She has partnered with multiple organizations and hospitals to design research studies and disseminate findings aimed at guiding nurses to influence and change practice. She has published in several prestigious journals including “Pediatrics” and “The American Journal of Public Health”.

Abstract:

Purpose: Non-ventilator hospital acquired pneumonia (NV-HAP) is an understudied disease, with substantial fiscal impacts and potential for reduction of morbidity and mortality. Because it is not required by regulatory agencies, most hospitals do not monitor NV-HAP. We sought to utilize transdisciplinary partnerships to determine the incidence and implement a basic oral care protocol to reduce NV-HAP. Background: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 study on hospital acquired infections indicated that NV-HAP (i.e., non-device related) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. We mined the Healthcare Utilization Project data set and found a NV-HAP rate of 4.3% (284,601/6,567,271). In several hospital systems, we found unreported NV-HAP rates of 1.22–8.9 per 1,000 hospital days, mean excess stay of 14 or more days, and NV-HAP on all types of hospital units. Further analysis indicated than 50% of our NV-HAP occurred in post-surgical patients. Methods: Our transdisciplinary team implemented a universal (i.e., every patient) new oral care protocol at a 600-bed community hospital. In addition, we partnered with perioperative nurses to implement a basic oral care protocol prior to surgery for every patient and added oral care to the standard perioperative check list. We used a descriptive, retrospective comparative study to determine changes in oral care delivery and prevalence of NV-HAP. The Influencer Model™ was used to manage the complexity of the multi-levels of intervention required. Results: Implementation of a universal oral care protocol, both in the perioperative area and on the floors, resulted in an overall decrease of NV-HAP by 71%, with a 75% decrease in post-operative patients (p<0.0001: (OR=0.292, 95%CI = 0.199, 0.429), extra cost for new therapeutic oral care equipment was $120,000. Cost savings resulting from 80 avoided NV-HAP cases was $3.2 million. Thus, return on investment for the organization was $3.08 million in avoided costs and an estimated 15 lives saved. Importantly we have sustained these positive outcomes over a three-year period of time.

Amballur David John

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA

Title: PACU update
Speaker
Biography:

A D John completed BA from Harvard University and MD from New York Medical College. He has done his Internal Medical Residency from Metro West Medical Center; Framingham, MA and Anesthesia and Critical Care Residency from Johns Hopkins Hospital; Baltimore, MD. He has done Cardiac Anesthesia subspecialty in Johns Hopkins Hospital; Baltimore, MD and Cardiac Anesthesiology Fellowship from Massachusetts General Hospital; Boston, MA. He is an instructor at Harvard Medical School; Boston, MA and also at Johns Hopkins School; Baltimore, MD. He is an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Baltimore, MD. He served as a Coeditor with Sancho Rodrigues-Villar for Protocols in Critical Care (in Press) and as an Editor for Anesthesia: Essential Clinical Updates for Provider (in Press)

Abstract:

The Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) is a key element in ensuring a successful operative experience. Recovery from surgery is dependent on a transition from intensive focus of the operating room to safe care in the hospital ward or home after surgery. The key area of transition is the Post Anesthetic Care Unit. It is in the PACU that the patient “awakens” from anesthesia. Respiratory function has to be maintained and stable vital signs have to be assured. In addition, pain issues as well as postoperative nausea have to be addressed. In an effort to facilitate throughput, each type of surgery is establishing protocols to aid in rapid recovery, minimize pain, increase ambulation, and decrease hospital stay. What are the keys to ensure patient safety in the PACU?

Speaker
Biography:

Anna Elizabeth Van den Heever obtained a MCur Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Cum Laude) in 2012 from the University of Johannesburg. She is presently an undergraduate psychosocial lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand. She published 2 articles in reputed journals and has a number of post graduate diplomas and experience in psychosocial nursing and working with addictive and personality disorders.

Abstract:

Psychosocial nursing students in their final year were asked to reflect on their emotional experiences and feelings during clinical placement with severely traumatised children. Despite four years of theoretical and clinical training in general, midwifery, community and psychiatric nursing, the students were found to be in a state of personal, emotional and ethical conflict with themselves and society and left a placement with the residue of unsolved issues and traumatic experiences. Rape, child neglect, abuse, environmental accidents and violence are only a few of the risk factors to the country’s health problems, resulting in children suffering severe developmental, and intellectual, psychological and physical disabilities. Attitudes in the community shift between disregard, stigmatization, rejection, sympathy and sadness. The question was asked: are students emotionally protected and prepared for the reality of coming face to face with severely emotionally, intellectually or physically traumatized children in the community? A purposive sample of written and marked narratives from psychosocial reflective journals of (16) final year students were used. Qualitative analysis of the narratives highlighted an emotional rollercoaster of feelings, ethical and professional conflict between the abused and being the abuser as well as admiration for those caring for them. Information gained will be applied towards continuous improvement of professional and clinical training and emotional support for students in practice.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ozcan has intense experience in diabetes nursing over 25 years. Currently teaching in undergraduate and graduate programmes in Koç University School of Nursing. Exec.Com.Member (2001-2007;2015- cont), Special Advisor (2007-2014) of FEND; Member of Diabetes Education Consultative Section(2008-2013) and Insulin Taskforce (2014-cont) of IDF; Exec.Com.Member and General Secretary of Turkish Diabetes Nursing Association (1998-2011); Member of Board of Trustee of Turkish Diabetes Foundation (2009-cont). Achieved scientific awards, research fundings, published articles and books. Member of the editorial board and review panels of the journals. Visiting professor at the New York University (2004-2005); guest researcher in Uppsala University/Sweden (2006); FEND Clinical Research Fellow in King’s College London&Hospital (2011).

Abstract:

Diabetes is an emerging health problem. Accordingly, number of people with diabetes doubled in the last 15 years in Turkey. Nurses need to be powered to deal with the burden of growing number of patients. The study which is a Turkish arm of SEND(Study of European Nurses in Diabetes) explored the role performance and job satisfaction of diabetes nurses in Turkey. Methods: Postal or electronic questionnaires were sent to the diabetes nurses via diabetes nurses network. In addition, the participants of the annual diabetes symposia filled the printed questionnaires. Finally, the study comprised of 161 diabetes nurses. Questionnaire included the questions regarding structure, process, and outcomes of the work of diabetes nurses, their role performance, and job satisfaction. Findings: Majority (72%) worked over 2 years as diabetes nurse. All nurses(n= 161) had full-time position, over 80% were employed in the inpatient and outpatient diabetes services of university and state hospitals. Of participants, 77% reported that their centers had over 1000 patients with diabetes in a year. Seventy-seven percent worked in the cities while the remaining participants worked in small towns and urban areas. Diabetes nurses had heavy workload; 24% of nurses cared and educated 2000 or more patients in a year. Half of participants reported that at least 20% of their patients were low educated. Most diabetes nurses provide diabetes care on individual base. Findings explored the roles of diabetes nurses as expert practitioner / care giver, educator, consultant, administrator, collaborator / liaison, change agent / innovator. The mean score of general job satisfaction was high (Mean±SD:4.03±0.83; min: 1-max: 5). Conclusion: Diabetes nurses showed high performance in their professional roles. Although they had heavy workload, their job satisfaction was high. Key-words: Diabetes nurse, role performance, job satisfaction

Speaker
Biography:

She had worked in the Internal Diseases Service of Ege University Medical Faculty Hospital in the years of 2008-2009, in the Oncology Clinic of Dokuz Eylul University Medical Faculty Hospital in the years of 2009-2011 and worked as a surgical nurse in the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty Hospital in the years of 2011-2014. She has been working as a lecturer in Cankiri Karatekin University. She graduated from the Psychiatry Nursing Master Programme of Adnan Menderes University Institute of Health Sciences in October 2015 and has been awarded the tittle of Specialist Nurse

Abstract:

This study is conducted as a cross sectional research in order to investigate the loneliness and related factors in adolescents of high school students.It is targeted to reach 690 students.In the study,Personal Information Form and UCLA Loneliness Scale are used.In the evaluation of the data,descriptive statistics,test in unrelated measurements,one way variance analysis are used. 657 of the adolescents, who participated to the survey, had replied the questions in the loneliness scale.The reviews were conducted with 657 adolescents.When the characteristics of adolescents of high school students who participated the survey are examined, it is found that 46.0% of the adolescents are female,30.6% of them study in 9th grade,30.9% of them are 17 years old and it is determined that they have medium level loneliness.It is found that the level of loneliness of female students(X ̅ =52.33±5.82) are higher than the male students (X ̅ =49.74±7.45).It is found that the loneliness situation of the adolescents is not affected by staying either with the parents or in the dormitory(t(649)=0.378; p>0.05),the family structure (t(641)=1.702;p>0.05),the region that they live(F(2.654)=2.342;p>0.05),income level (F(2.654)=1.978;p>0.05),seeing their pocket money sufficient (t(665)=0,033; p>0,05),the number of siblings(F(2.633)=0.468;p>0.05),the relation with their siblings (t(623)=1.209;p>0.05),the education level of their fathers(F(3.648)=1.596;p>0.05)and mothers(X2(3)=0.965;p>0.05).It is determined that the loneliness level of adolescents whose mothers are employed(X ̅ =52.33±6.45)are higher than the adolescents whose mothers are not employed(X ̅ =50.81±6.79).The loneliness level of the adolescents who have the idea of self-harm in the recent year(X ̅ =53.10±5.36) is higher than the adolescents who do not have the idea of self-harm in the recent year(X ̅=50.82±6.89).

Rana Abed Alhelali

Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia

Title: Principals of home health care in Saudi Arabia
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Alhelali is consultant family physician with two certificates; the Saudi board of family medicine 2009 & the Arab board of family & community medicine 2010. She is working as director of Home Medical Care Center in Ministry of Health (MOH) in Madinah. She works in family medicine clinic in primary health care (PHC) in MOH. She is a trainer in postgraduate training program of family medicine in Madinah. In May 2014, she earned a Master degree in public health from Rollins School of Public health at Emory University, Atlanta, USA. Regarding research, she conducted two studies: “Prevalence of Burnout among Ministry Of Health Physicians in Madinah, Saudi Arabia, 2008 “ and “Evaluation of Home Respiratory Therapy Delivered to Patients in the Ministry of Health’s Home Medical Program (HMP) and Administered through the Madinah HMP Center, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 2013”. This study was published in Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health (JEGH) August 2015.

Abstract:

The various benefits of incorporating home health care (HHC) in the health system are known worldwide. Research reveals that home health care has a role in improving the clinical outcomes of patients, that it is cost-effective, and that it is an excellent solution for the bed occupancy issue, freeing hospital beds for acute cases while ensuring quality care for stable patients with chronic health issues. In this lecture, there will be an illustration of home health care and its basic principles through definitions and demonstrating cases scenarios. There will be highlighting on HHC’s importance in any health system by evidence. A comprehensive team runs HHC in Saudi Arabia, and the nursing care is the cornerstone of these services. Here, we will know the role of each team member in HHC: family physicians, nurses and other support teams. Moreover, the services provided through HHC programs are different from country to country, but most programs are community-based, so, the experience of Madinah’s Home health care center will be discussed at the end of this presentation.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Glenn Ford Valdez at 30 is an Assistant Tutor and Program /Course Coordinator in Salalah Nursing Institute, Ministry of Health Sultanate of Oman for 5 years, he has 10 years of Nursing Practice and Nursing Administration/ Education Experience combined. He is an Operating Theater Nurse and Nurse Educator in the Philippines. He graduated Bachelor of Nursing in year 2005 in Dr. Yangas Colleges in the Philippines, Masters of Arts in Nursing in 2007 – St. Jude College Graduate School, Manila , Earned Units of His Doctor of Nursing Management in 2011 at Trinity University of Asia and His Doctor of Philosophy in Education Leadership and Management in 2015 at St. Jude College Graduate School he finished his Bachelors, Masters and Doctoral Degrees with High Distinction/ Magna Cum laude ; He is a recipient of Leadership Awards and Teaching Excellence Awards. Recently named as one of the 10 Most Outstanding Filipino Overseas Workers) for 2015 awarded by the Philippine Embassy in Muscat, Oman. He is a community leader with advocacies on health, gender equality and transcultural integration. His Research Inclination is in Nursing Education, Education Management Process, Outcome Predictors, Trans cultural Nursing and Diversity.

Abstract:

Nursing practice in the Philippines is comprised of several components in order to lawfully practice the profession. . In the advent of changing times and the lucrative offers overseas to work as professional nurse the Professional Filipino nurses have found their way across the Diaspora crossing continents in search for a far greener pasture The researcher utilized an online survey study wherein the respondents are the Philippine Registered Nurses working in the GCC were asked to identify their perceived context of what educationally prepared , competent and culture adaptive nurses should be . The Study utilized quota sampling from all six (6)GCC states comprised of Bahrain, Kuwait , Qatar , Oman , Saudi Arabia and the UAE . The internal consistency (Chronbach Alpha) was 0.950, Indicating that the measures that are used for the instrument is highly reliable . Data collected were analyzed statistically using descriptive and Parametric measurements such as MANOVA and Pearson r. The foregoing results of the study shows the following indices related to demographic profile on aspect of gender the study showed that 56.67% of the Respondents are female and 43.33% are male.. In terms of country of work 45 % of the respondent was from Oman, followed by Saudi Arabia 22%, Bahrain 10%, UAE 10%, Kuwait 9.3%, and Qatar 3%. The perusal of the findings shows the level of cultural adaptability of the respondents it shows that the level of adaptability in terms of knowing the Health and Illness beliefs in Islam rendered a mean of 3.03 which may imply the higher requirement for the nurses to be familiarized and culturally competent . This is seconded by Traditional practice and belief with a mean score of 3.280 this implies that the nurses in the GCC perceives that knowledge about rational belief and practice and its implications to their daily work.

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaoling Li has completed her Master degree from Chiang Mai University of Thailand 1996. Her research interests include postoperative pain control, surgical patient’s quality of life and teaching methods and skills training. She has published more than 35 professional articles and edited 7 professional books. She is a master's tutor and has rich teaching experience. She has taught several courses at both undergraduate and graduate level.

Abstract:

Objective: To investigate the effect of teaching method reformation and its outcome in the course of Nursing Interpersonal Communication and Etiquette (NICE) for nursing undergraduates. Methods: Recruit nursing undergraduate students (short for “Nursing Students”) coming from Grade 2012 and Grade 2013 and then set it as control group and experimental group, respectively. The control group used traditional teaching methods while the experimental group implemented the reformed teaching methods. In the reformed methods, the syllabus was amended with reduced total teaching hours and increased proportion of practice class. The role play and case discussion teaching method were applied in the experimental group. When the course was over, same questionnaire of students’ satisfaction and examination of the course were assessed and analyzed. Results: There were significant differences in students’ satisfaction of the course (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in examination grades between the two groups. Conclusion: In the teaching process of NICE curriculum, arranging the course one year in advance, limiting the teaching hours of theory and increasing the ratio of practice time can be propitious to enhance theory understanding and communicating knowledge application of nursing students, which not only boost their comprehensive ability of nursing students but also ensure the quality of the course teaching.

Speaker
Biography:

Abdulkarim Alzayyat completed his Master Degree in Clinical Nursing in 2013 with first rank in Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing subspecialty from The University of Jordan. Mr. Alzayyat had a deep involvement in community mental health research and he had been awarded several research Awards. Mr. Alzayyat has so far published more than 10 papers most of them are published in ISI international journals and conferences.

Abstract:

The literature revealed that Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is the most utilized tool to measure clinical education stress among nursing students. The aim of this methodological study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the PSS. The study used a cross-sectional design with all questionnaires completed at classrooms. Data was collected from 160 undergraduate nursing students whom were recruited by simple random method. The study was conducted on five Jordanian universities during the 2014–2015 academic year. The exploratory factor analyses of the 29-item PSS illustrated that a five-factor solution presented the most robust explanation of the collected data. These factors are clinical teachers, providing nursing care, situation unfamiliarity, nature of clinical practice, and student’s role demands. Moreover, the scale-level CVI for the PSS was 0.94. On the other hand, the total PSS scale alpha coefficient was 0.92 and alpha coefficients for the five subscales were ranging from 0.65 to 0.83. This study supports the use of Arabic version to measure clinical education stress among Jordanian nursing students. Future studies should test the validity of the PSS by using of more advanced analyses that boost the gained results of this exploratory study

Speaker
Biography:

Liu suzhen has completed her Master of Nursing Science in Qiang Mai University,Thailand. Her research interests is community health nursing, focus on chronic illness management in community, She has taught several courses at both undergraduate and graduate level. She is the director of Community Health Nursing Branch, Nursing association of Sichuan province, and academic header of Sichuan Health Bureau. She published more than 60 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Client satisfaction is one of the desired outcomes of community health care. From 1999, chronic illness management care has being provided in community health agency in China. Now, It is one of basic task of community health. By the end of 2014, there were 397 community health centers in 21 cities of Sichuan. This study armed to assess blood pressure control, to discrible satisfaction level of hypertension patients in urban communities of Sichuan provienc, and to explore the relationship between blood pressure control and patients’ satisfaction. The cross-sectional survey was condacted. Convinence sampling and face-to-face interview were used. Totally, 2279 hepertension patients in urban communities in 12 cities completed questionnaire survey. 89.1% Questionnaires(2030) were effective. The results showed 1317(64.88%) community patients controled their high blood pressure successfully. The total satisfaction score was 3.91±0.67. The ranking of sub-satisfaction scale score from higher to lower was nursing etiquette, nursing technique, care provided by other health worker, following-up care by nurses, collaborating with other health workers and health guiding by nurses. There was statistic difference between satisfaction scores patients with successful blood pressure control or not (t=2.88, P=0.004). This finding indicated blood pressure control rate of patients received chronic illness management care provided by community health center were improved. However, patients did not satisfied with chronic illness management care provided by nurses. Promoting nursing care may increase blood pressure control of patients with hypertension.

  • Pregnancy & women health
Speaker
Biography:

Prof Priscilla Reddy holds a PhD from Maastricht University (NL), an MPH from the University of Massachusetts (USA) and a BSc degree in nursing from the University of Cape Town (SA). She has supervised more than 15 PhD students. She holds several prestigious awards for academic excellence. She has conducted research as a PI in maternal and child healthcare, NCDs, tobacco control, youth rick behaviours, etc. with grants from reputable funders such as the British MRC, Wellcome Trust, CDC, and NIH RO1 grants. She has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and has been serving as a reviewer for number of peer-reviewed journals. She has served on a number of national and international committees as a board member, including the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf), McMaster University / Maastricht University Global health Programme; and served on expert panels for the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science of the USA (IOM), National Committee for Health Research, World Health Organization Health Promotion Glossary Reference Group, International Presidential AIDS Panel established by the President of South Africa, to name a few.

Abstract:

Provision of efficient emergency obstetric care is critical in maternal and child healthcare (MCH) services. The purpose of this paper is to determine the association between education and skills training related to MCH for the provision of adequate neonatal care in South Africa (SA). A self-administered questionnaire was used in this cross-sectional study; to assess healthcare professionals’ education, continuous professional development (CPD) training, and the provision of adequate and sufficient care for the neonates in the MCH services. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s correlation analysis were used to analyze the data, and to ascertain the associations between the measures. Of the 193 respondents, 65.1% were working as registered nurses, whilst 30.8% were registered midwives, the remainder were either staff nurses or enrolled nurses. Certain basic and essential protocols, such as assessing and recording the Apgar score in all neonates at 2 and 5 minutes after birth, were not always conducted at deliveries. There was a significant positive correlation between a CPD training and provision of basic obstetric care for the neonate (r = 0.81). CPD training is a critical intervention in obstetric services where updated knowledge of protocols is necessary to identify and manage high-risk pregnancies and provide efficient neonatal care. A training programme that imparts the correct knowledge and that improves the clinical skills of both registered midwives and nurses, will help reduce the maternal and infant mortality rates in SA.

Speaker
Biography:

Susette Brynard is currently a lecturer in Education Management at the University Free State, South Africa. Previously she was Head of the Department Natural Sciences, Bloemfontein College of Education. She was born in South Africa and graduated at the University Free State to receive a B. Sc.-degree. While lecturing Biology at an Education College she commenced her studies at the University of the Free State, where she received the B Ed (honors) and M Ed Degrees Cum Laude and then her Ph.D. She received numerous awards during her studies and published two papers on the Education and development of Down syndrome learners. She has been involved in creating opportunities for Down syndrome children and provided support for parents and families with Down syndrome children for many years. She is doing ground-breaking work on the role of parents in the education of Down syndrome learners.

Abstract:

The aim of the paper is to illustrate the important role that parents can play in the education of learners with Down syndrome (DS). A literature review was done to obtain background information on the concept DS and on the history and possibilities of education for learners with DS, as well as on the role of the parent in the education of learners with DS. A qualitative case study, focusing on the narrative approach was implemented to illustrate the management of the educational opportunities and thus, the self-fulfillment of all learners with DS. The educational history of an academically successful girl with DS was followed in order to establish what lay behind her success. From the findings it can be deduced that parents and educators should collaborate to enhance the educational opportunities of learners with DS. The contribution this article makes is to convey to educators and parents the important role they can play in the advancement of the education of learners with DS, as a possible way to give these learners a better chance to live a meaningful life. The assumption is that if learners with DS receive optimal stimulation and encouragement from their parents and teachers in collaboration with one another, from an early age, their educational skills and self-fulfillment will benefit to a large extent. This will improve their opportunities to become valued human beings.

Shona Hamilton

Northern Health and Social Care trust and Queen’s University Belfast, UK

Title: Developing a regional perinatal mental health pathway
Speaker
Biography:

Shona Hamilton qualified as a nurse and then a midwife in Belfast and has worked in a variety of posts within the nursing midwifery profession. Her professional and academic interests lie in public health, intrapartum care and perinatal mental health. Shona currently works as a Consultant Midwife in Northern Health and Social Care Trust and Queens University Belfast. Shona is involved in the current Maternal Mental Health Alliance Campaign on maternal mental health.

Abstract:

This Regional Pathway has been implemented throughout Northern Ireland in five Health and Social care Trusts. It was developed by a multi-professional group with the support and direction of the Public Health Agency (NI). It is intended that the care pathway will facilitate a consistent regional approach for all pregnant and postnatal women in Northern Ireland. Mental ill health, complicating pregnancy and the postpartum year, is relatively common. In some cases this illness may be of a serious nature and may have long lasting effects, not only on maternal health, but also on child development and family relationships. Women with pre-existing mental health illness may have a relapse or recurrence of their illness following childbirth. Women who previously have been symptom free may have an elevated risk of suffering from a mood disorder particularly the more serious mood disorders in the postnatal period. Puerperal psychosis in the UK has an overall incidence of 2:1,000 births (Jones, 2010). The group recognized that the antenatal period offers professionals a unique opportunity to screen for risk factors associated with maternal mental ill health and thereby ensuring appropriate early interventions are provided, including referral to the best available services. Identifying and treating mental ill health is not only beneficial for the woman but also for the future health and wellbeing of her child and the family unit as a whole. A regional training strategy provided the support and education during the implementation phase and the pathway is now an integral part of midwifery practice.

Speaker
Biography:

Zekiye Karaçam is a Professor at Adnan Menderes University Aydin School of Health, Division of Midwifery. She completed her PhD in Obstetrics and Gynecology Nursing from Hacettepe University Health Science Institute. She worked at Hacettepe University as Lecturer and nurse up to 2004. She worked at Adnan Menderes University since 2004. She is head of the Department of Midwifery. She has published 16 international papers and 21 national papers in reputed journals and has been serving as reviewers for some international and national journals.

Abstract:

The aim of the study was to examine the content and quality of the intrapartum care services in vaginal births in the example of a government hospital in Turkey, by use of the Bologna Score. This cross-sectional study was performed between January 2013 and December 2014, in Aydin Maternity and Children Hospital, Turkey. The sample of the study included 303 Turkish women gave birth normal vaginally delivery using convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire prepared by the researchers and Bologna Score. Descriptive statistics were used for all variables. The mean age of women was 25.14±5.37 and 40.5% of women were in first-time mothers. Of the women 7.3% had not the spontaneous onset of the labor and 45.2% were admitted in the latent phase to the hospital, 76.6% were applied enemas, 3.3% had epidural anesthesia, 2.6% gave birth with the help of vacuum extraction and episiotomy were performed on 54.1% of the women. Twenty three point eight percent of the women had spontaneous laceration requiring stitches. Two infants had an Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes after birth. When evaluated the quality of intrapartum care using the Bologna Score, in 92.7% of women labor began as spontaneous, all deliveries were assisted by midwives and doctors, 7 women had a companion, and non-supine position was used for 1 woman. Percent of a partograph use was 72.6, bonding between mothers and their infants was started within one hour after birth for 82.5% of women. Induction of labor was used for 76.6% of women and fundal pressure was applied to 27.4% of women. This study revealed that there was insufficient quality of intrapartum care in vaginal deliveries. To improve the mother and infant health, intrapartum care services should be reorganized according to the World Health Organization's recommendations and evidence-based practice.

Speaker
Biography:

Hande DAG has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from Ege University Institute of Health Science. She had worked in Ege University Faculty of Nursing, as a Research Assistant between 2008- 2015. She has published more than 16 papers in journals about infertility, hysterectomy, amniocentesis, discharge readyness after birth subjects. She has Internatıonal Certıfıcate On Laboratory Anımal Science, attend Combating Youth Violence-Education, in England, in 2012; 'Training Course on Sexual and Reproductive Health of Adolescents' of ICC & UNFPA in Bilkent, Ankara, 2009; Erasmus programme and worked in Copenhagen/Denmark as a nursing student in 2007.

Abstract:

This study was performed by using qualitative and phenomonological research methods and aimed to determine the stressors experienced by infertile women, the effects of identified stressors and the responses given to this stressors according to Neuman Systems Model (NSM) through in-depth interviews. Qualitative and phenomonological research method were used in this study. This research was carried out with volunteer 15 primer infertile women who were experienced treatment failures and choosen according to homogeneous and criterial purposive sampling methods by using in-depth interviews in Infertility Research and Practice Center (IRPC) of an university hospital from December 2012 to 2013. Participants received an informed consent forms before interviews were conducted. In data analyzing, content analysis method and Nvivo 10 software programme were used. The stressors which were experienced by infertil women were divided into two groups such as Internal and External stressors and their effects on women were investigated in Core Response group. Inside the Internal Stressors group Intrapersonal Stressors which contain 11 sub-themes were found. In External Stressors Group such as main themes of Interpersonal Stressors and Extrapersonal Stressors were determined. Interpersonal Stressors contain 4 and Extrapersonal Stressors contain 7 sub-themes. Certain themes for Core Response Group such as Psychological Reactions, Physical Reactions and Defense Mechanisms themes were determined. Using NSM in this classification was found appropriate. Nurses should use this classification to evaluate the stressors of infertil women and care them in this direction.

Speaker
Biography:

Simge Zeyneloglu is an Associate Professor of Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing at Gaziantep University.

Abstract:

This study was conducted in order to determine the opinions of women who had a cesarean delivery (CD) and the problems that they faced in the postpartum period. This descriptive study was conducted with 337 women who delivered babies by cesarean section in order to determine the opinions and problems of women towards cesarean delivery. The data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results of the study showed that 53.4% of women underwent cesarean delivery for the first time and 83.1% said that it was the obstetrician’s decision to have a cesarean delivery. More than half of the women (61.1%) had a negative experience with cesarean delivery due to postpartum pain (44.7%) and inability to care for their infant (35.9%). The most common problems associated with cesarean delivery were postpartum pain (96.1%), back pain (68.2%), problems passing gas (62.0%), bleeding (56.1%), feeding problems (49.6%) and limitation of movement (43.6%) respectively. Understanding the opinions and problems of women towards cesarean delivery assists healthcare professionals in identifying better ways to provide appropriate care and support.

Speaker
Biography:

Evrim Celebi has completed her PhD on public health nursing from Firat University. She is working as assistant professor in Firat University Faculty of Health Sciences.

Abstract:

Background: University students spend most of their time in their schools, and the university environment may affect students' nutrition and physical activity. On the contrary, midwifery students are an important part of health labor and should be a role model for individuals they serve in terms of positive health behaviors. Objectives: This descriptive study aimed to determine physical activity levels of students in the Firat University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Midwifery. Methods: The entire study population was included without sampling, and the study was conducted on 262 students (88.8%). Personal information form and short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire were used to collect data. The data were analyzed using the statistical package with a chi-square test Results: Of the midwifery students, only 4.6% were active at a sufficient level, 63.4% were active at a low level, and 32.1% were physically inactive. The physical activity levels of the students were analyzed according to their age, year in the university, and body mass index. The distributions were found to be similar to each other. Conclusion: Approximately three fourths of the midwifery students in this study were found to have normal body weight but insufficient physical activity levels.

Speaker
Biography:

Working as Professor at College of Nursing at Umm Al Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. She holds Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing from India and she pursued her Post-doctoral Nursing administration degree from USA. With more than twenty years of experience in nursing education, she held national credentials as a Member, Inspection committee in Indian Nursing Council, State Nursing Council and the T.N.Dr.M.G.R.Medical University from 2001 to 2012.She was awarded as best teacher in Nursing education in 2012 from the T.N.Dr.M.G.R.Medical University. She published more than 30 of her Article in national and international reputed Journals.

Abstract:

Introduction: Kangaroo mother care has often been used as a treatment for premature or preterm babies. As the 21st century is in the threshold of challenging preventive healthy interventions, the evidence based practice of newborn care must be efficiently adopted for applying in the operational milieu of rural care facilities and the awareness on KMC should be taught , among the expected mothers in all country wide, perinatal-neonatal care units. Aim: To determine the level of knowledge and practices regarding KMC among the mothers with preterm babies. To find out the association between the knowledge and practices regarding KMC among the mothers with preterm babies. To determine the association between the knowledge and practices regarding KMC among the mothers with preterm babies with their selected demographic variables. To develop a self-instructional module for rural health Centers for the selected rural maternity health centers. Materials and Methods: The conceptual framework of this study was based on Pendersons Health Promotion Model. Descriptive survey approach was adopted, where the structured interview schedule was conducted to collect the data to assess their knowledge and their practices on KMC. Sampling Technique: Purposive sampling Technique was used for this study where 60 postnatal mothers with pre-term babies were included in the research. Findings: Majority of the mothers had inadequate knowledge (65%), none of them had adequate knowledge. The mothers who belonged to moderate practices of KMC were 76.66%, in comparison with 23.33% of mothers with adequate practices. In association of knowledge with practices, it was revealed that, the mean knowledge scores of subjects were found to be 39.48% only, with the SD of 3.1, which fall in the category of average knowledge, further to this, it was found that the mean practice scores of subjects were 66.12, with a SD value of 1.54, which concluded that the respondents had higher level of practices as compared to the level of knowledge on KMC. There was a positive correlation between knowledge and practices of postnatal mothers regarding KMC. There was a positive association found between level of knowledge and practices with demographic variables such as age, education and parity. Conclusion: It was concluded that there is a need to improve the knowledge and the practices with regard to KMC, hence the self- instructional module was developed for the maternity centre’s to promote the wellbeing of neonatal care of preterm babies.

Speaker
Biography:

Gizem Güneş is a Research Assistant at Adnan Menderes University Aydin School of Health, Division of Midwifery. She has completed Hermaster at Adnan Menderes University Health Science Institute midwifery. She has worked at Adnan Menderes University since 2013.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to assess abuse, sexual abuse and posttraumatic stress disorders associated with experiencing discomfort during the vaginal examination. This descriptive study was carried with 320 women who are hospitalized in Aydin Women Birth and Child Disorders Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. The data was obtained through Information Form about Women and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder checklist- Civilian Version. Descriptive statistics, t-test, variance, Mann Whitney U, Kruskal Wallis and Chi-square analysis were employed while assessing the data. The average age of the women in the study was 26.32±5.98. The average experiencing discomfort score during the vaginal examination of the women is 3.92±3.34. Also twenty six percent of the women reported strong discomfort during the vaginal examination. It was established that sixty four percent of the women reported Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It was established that experienced of physical, emotional and sexual abuse in women increased to occurrence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It was found out that 11.9% of women experienced emotional abuse, that 7.8% experienced physical abuse. Also 7.8% of women reported that were forced sexual intercourse by their partners. Forty percent of that women described forcing sexual intercourse by partners as an abuse. Emotional abuse history, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and live birth rate were associated with a discomfort during the vaginal examination. The study revealed that experiencing discomfort during the vaginal examination of the women more likely reported Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and emotional abuse. Decreasing a live birth-rate increased a strong discomfort during the vaginal examination. There was not an association between strong discomfort during the vaginal examination and a sexual abuse history. Integrating of these results into care during vaginal examination might make a positive difference for vaginal examination experience in women and reduce trauma of women.

Speaker
Biography:

Ibtisam Titi has completed M.Sc. from AL Quds University - Master in Health Management. She is a Mother and Child Health Supervisor in Ministry of Health at North Hebron directorate. Participated in many heath researches with the school of public health at Al Quads University, East Jerusalem. Participated in the Lancet Health Alliance Conferences for five times, this research has been published in The LANCET on December 2013.

Abstract:

The incident of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Hypertension disorders during pregnancy (HDP) are increasing and are associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Appropriate prenatal and postnatal follow up care was shown to control and reduce the adverse health outcomes on mothers and their children. Literature was collected from different sources including PubMed. This study aims to evaluate antennal and postnatal care for pregnant women with GDM and HDP at the Ministry of Health high risk pregnancies (HRP) clinics in Hebron district for the year 2009 and to identify the determinants of prenatal and postnatal management of the adverse maternal complications related to GDM and HDP. All files of women registered at the main six HRP clinics from January 1 to December 31 in 2009 were investigated to estimate prevalence of GD and GH. Then, from October 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011 we followed up all the women who during last delivery in 2009 had GD and/or GH. also, women’s files with other complications were randomly selected as comparative group. A questionnaire interview was performed. SPSS version 16 was used in data analyses(p<0·05). We found significant differences of complications between cases and the comparison groups and also cases’ infants suffered from all complications in higher percentage than the comparison group.

Speaker
Biography:

I completed my MD from Kharvkov Medical Institute and postdoctoral studies from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, The Netherlands. I have many papers on national and international journals on women and health. I had also advocated for making abortion legal in Nepal and later on lobbied with policy makers to provide training to nurses so that they could deliver safe abortion services in remote areas of Nepal. I have translated books from Hesperian published, “Where women have no doctors “, A health guidelines for women with disability and” A book for midwives” (http://hesperian.org/2014/02/05/3-womens-health-titles-released-in-nepali/). I have also worked as public health and maternal child health specialist in Afghanistan, India, Sri Lanka, Iran, Tibet, Iran and most remote parts of Nepal. I also write regularly in national and internal paper on the issue of women and nutrition, women and mental health, role of midwife in women’s health.

Abstract:

Till last decade, women in Nepal were denied basic reproductive rights and abortion was not legal. Low access to health care had resulted in high Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) -- 790 per 100,000 live births in 1990. According to the World Health Organization these deaths were largely attributable to complications related to delivery and unsafe abortions. Maternal morbidity was rampant including sepsis, pelvic infection, infertility etc. Nepalese health program launched in 2002 was seminal in looking beyond MMR and focusing on maternal morbidity and enhancing utilization of public health services. In addition, Advocacy and activism from grass root levels to the corridors of the parliament led to legalization and decriminalization of abortion in 2002 which aided in reduction of unsafe abortion related maternal mortality. At the beginning of the implementation of safe abortion service, only doctors were allowed to provide services to the patients but health rights activists conducted advocacy so that nurse practitioner, Auxiliary nurse midwives also could deliver safe abortion in remote areas of Nepal where doctors are not available. This advocacy brought fruit and now nurses are allowed to provide safe abortion services after taking training provided by the government. Other strategies were also made by the Ministry of Health so that women who are in need of safe abortion service, family planning council could have access to those services. This presentation elucidates the public health system strengthening strategies which led to successes in maternal health in Nepal and achievement of Millennium Development Goal 5 — reduction in MMR (190 in 2013). The specific strategies which ultimately led to lowering maternal mortality include consistent political commitment and policy focus on maternal health over the last two decades with increased funding to improve quantity and quality of care. These steps led to increased access to health care, mobilization of 52,000 Female Community Health Volunteers, trained nurses and mother’s groups, availability of trained health workers, and expansion of pharmacies and private health sector. At the beginning Steps were taken to improve service delivery and these consisted of provision of basic obstetric emergency care, strengthening birthing centers, provision of Misopristol and launching free delivery service, abolition of user fees, and initiation of evidence based provider incentive program called ‘aama surkakchya’( security of mother ) However, despite the success of maternal health programs some challenges remain including inadequacies in data collection and increasing sex-selective abortion which continue to threaten women’s health in Nepal.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Breastfeeding was and still is viewed as the optimal method of infants’ feeding. Its benefits for both infant and mother have long been recognized and are widely documented. Objective of this study was to investigate breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, practices and perceived barriers among Saudi women in the National Guard Hospital in Jeddah. A descriptive correlational cross-sectional design was used to collect data from a convenient sample of 100 Saudi women. The study participants were recruited from Ward2, King Khalid Hospital in National Guard, Jeddah. Women were interviewed face to face after agreeing to participate in the study. Data was collected by using five sections structured questionnaire: Socio-demographic background; breastfeeding knowledge; breastfeeding perceived barriers and breastfeeding practice; and Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale (IIFAS). The mean age of the women was 28.2±6.55 years and (83%) of them were highly educated. Majority of the participants were housewives (77.2%) and (33.7%) of them had a house keeper. Two thirds of the participants (62%) had a good knowledge regarding breastfeeding’s health benefits for mother and baby. However, minority of them (10%) had positive attitude toward breastfeeding. The most commonly reported barriers were Insuffient milk supply and lack of knowledge (82%). A statistically significant correlation was found between breastfeeding knowledge and maternal age (r = 0.22), also there was a good significant correlation between women’s knowledge and their attitude (r = 0.60) toward breastfeeding. Although Saudi women have good knowledge regarding breastfeeding importance, they have neutral attitude toward it and several barriers might prevent them from its practice.

Sezer Kısa

Gazi University Faculty of Health Sciences Department of Nursing, Turkey

Title: Opinions of women towards cesarean delivery and priority issues of care in the postpartum period
Speaker
Biography:

Sezer Kısa, PhD, is an associate professor at Gazi University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing. She recieved her doctoral degree from Hacettepe University. Her research area is aging of women, women’s health, reproductive health, nursing administration and health services utilization.

Abstract:

This study was conducted, in order to determine the opinions of women who had a cesarean delivery (CD) and the problems that they faced in the postpartum period. This descriptive study was conducted with 337 women who delivered babies by cesarean section in order to determine the opinions and problems of women towards cesarean delivery. The data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results of the study showed that 53.4% of women underwent cesarean delivery for the first time, and 83.1% said that it was the obstetrician’s decision to have a cesarean delivery. More than half of the women (61.1%) had a negative experience with cesarean delivery due to postpartum pain (44.7%) and inability to care for their infant (35.9%). The most common problems associated with cesarean delivery were postpartum pain (96.1%), back pain (68.2%), problems passing gas (62.0%), bleeding (56.1%), feeding problems (49.6%) and limitation of movement (43.6%) respectively. Understanding the opinions and problems of women towards cesarean delivery assists healthcare professionals in identifying better ways to provide appropriate care and support.

Speaker
Biography:

Nour Eldaim Elnoman Elbadawi is an Associate Professor of Medical Biochemistry and has completed his PhD from Gezira University College Of Medicine (Sudan) and participated in many national, regional and international scientific activities. He is the Director of student affairs at Shaqra University (KSA). He has published more than 14 papers in reputed journals and has a lot of unpublished works. He has been serving as a reviewer for various journals.

Abstract:

To determine if quinine has a metabolic effect during treatment of severe or complicated malaria, we studied its effects on plasma glucose and plasma insulin levels in 150 pregnant women with malaria referred to Madani Maternity Teaching Hospital, Gezira state and 50 healthy pregnant controls. Levels were determined at baseline (day 0) before the start of quinine treatment, after 2 days of treatment (2 hours after the 4th dose) and after 7 days of treatment (day 8). There was a statistically significant increase in plasma insulin concentrations during the quinine infusion and fall in plasma glucose concentration (P<0.001). Quinine administered at the recommended dose and rate can disrupt plasma glucose homeostasis although it is still the drug of choice for severe and complicated malaria in Sudan.