Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 23rd World Nursing and Healthcare Conference Golden Tulip Berlin - Hotel Hamburg, Berlin, Germany.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Geneva M Edwards

Unlawful Medicine LLC, USA

Keynote: Improving the care of gero-psychiatric patients in a complicated healthcare system

Time : 9:30AM-10:00AM

World Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Geneva M Edwards photo
Biography:

Dr. Edwards is a medical professional with 35 years’ experience in healthcare.  She is a RN, medical investigator, legal nurse consultant and medical writer.  She holds a MHA degree, a MD degree & she completed post-doctoral fellowship training in researching and analyzing medical data at CDC in Atlanta GA. Her passion lies in caring for the elderly and investigating what happens when medicine and law collide. For more than 6 years, Dr. Edwards has volunteered healthcare services to 3rd world countries; earning her the status of Dame of Grace, Dame of Honor and Dame of the Grand Cross.

Abstract:

As a person ages there is a regression in both physical and mental health. This deterioration results in one’s ability to deal with physiological/psychosocial demands. The world’s population is significantly growing. According to the United Nations World Population Prospects 2012, the average human lifespan is 70.7 years, 68.2 years for males and 73.2 years for females. According to WHO, In the US, the human life expectancy is approximately 78.2 years for men and 81 years for women; predicting that within the next 35 years the proportion of the elderly is estimated to increase approximately 10%. This is alarming because there is already a shortage of professionals who provide geriatric mental health services. In 2030, it is estimated that there will only be approximately 1650 geriatric psychiatrists in the US; one geriatric psychiatrist per 6000 geriatric psych patient. Of the aging population, 20% have one mental disorder that has negative effects on their health. Research has proven that elderly are likely to have greater disability, worse health outcomes and higher rates of hospitalization and emergency services than older patients with just a physical condition. Last but not least, the cost per person with mental illness and a medical illness is estimated to be 50% to 200% higher than patients with a medical illness only.

The geriatric population (65 years and older), is most likely to experience frequent, complex interactions with the healthcare system; a system so complex that it has trouble meeting their basic healthcare needs. Unfortunately, as the aging population increases so do mental disorders associated with aging (Alzheimer’s Dementia, Anxiety, Major Depressive Disorder, Suicide Ideation, etc.).  Therefore, the growing geriatric population underlines the need for the development of concrete interventions to improve the care of geriatric psych patients in a complicated healthcare system.

World Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Julie M. Pullen photo
Biography:

Julie Pullen holds a DNP from Concordia University Wisconsin, a Master’s of Science in Nursing and Counseling Psychology.  She practiced full-time as a Family Nurse Practitioner before completing a post-master’s certification in geriatrics.  She is a certified geriatric nurse practitioner.  Her doctoral project, focusing on suicide prevention in long-term care, was published in a geriatric journal.  She currently serves on a community suicide prevention coalition and educates Montana State University faculty, staff, and students in suicide prevention gatekeeper training.

Abstract:

Gatekeeper training remains fundamental to broad suicide prevention strategies on international, national, and state levels within the U.S.  Among articles reviewed, gatekeeper training was found, with few exception, to be both beneficial and feasible to varying degrees.   This study describes outcomes of gatekeeper training implemented in a community located in a rural northwestern state ranking among the highest for suicide. The aim of this multi-method study was twofold: Examine outcomes of an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer adopted by one community at-large, and develop recommendations guiding future population-based interventions for the area.   Data were collected utilizing pre- post-survey questionnaires administered from January, 2013 through September, 2016. Participants were from churches, social services, public health, mental health, a suicide prevention conference, a school, college, and a university (n = 897).  The quantitative results were statistically significant (p < 0.0001).  The most significant improvements from pre- to post-training were how to ask about suicide, how to persuade the person to receive help, and information about local resources.  From the qualitative data, two main themes consistent across cohorts that emerged were ‘appreciation’ and ‘desire’ or ‘need’ to learn more. Overall, results were consistent with other studies suggesting that a public health approach to suicide prevention shows promise in terms of increasing awareness and perceived knowledge and ability to intervene.  Findings may be relevant to other rural communities where access to mental health services are limited, however it remains unclear if gatekeeper training impacts suicide rates

  • Nursing Education
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Chesanny Butler completed her PhD from Oakland University with a certification in nursing education. She has been a nurse for over 20 years and a nurse educator for 7 years. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of South Carolina Beaufort in South Carolina, USA where she focuses on baccalaureate nursing education

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to identify congruent areas of clinical practice for graduating nursing students as a first step in potentially influencing job retention and satisfaction within the first year of nursing.  A quantitative survey research design was used to analyze individual personality signatures using a cross section of registered nurses from the United States as compared to graduating senior Baccalaureate nursing students from a large Midwest four-year doctoral research (L4/NR, DRU) university.  The RN sample was comprised of nine specialties.  The student sample was comprised of six specialties and drew from both the traditional and second-degree baccalaureate nursing programs offered within a school of nursing.  The target number of participants to obtain a power of 0.05 was obtained for both populations and totaled a final study sample of 815 participants.  Two surveys: 1) The TCI-140-R, and 2) demographic questions comprised of variables found to influence personality in the literature, were administered online to participant groups to identify levels of the seven basic dimensions of temperament and character.  Univariate analysis made multiple and covariate comparisons between TCI-140-R scores, registered nurse groups by specialty, baccalaureate nursing students, age, gender, race, employment status, program, maturity level, and highest level of nursing education.  Significant main effects for age and specialty by group were detected in several Temperament and Character Inventory dimensions.  Both registered nurses and Baccalaureate senior nursing students had similar personality patterns by specialty although the specific level of Cooperativeness (caring and compassion) found in each specialty was significantly different.

Speaker
Biography:

Ywonne Peterson, Sweden, is a Family therapist and holds a Master in social work, SR Nurse. Y.Peterson has been active for many years as a consulting supervisor and trainer of professionals who are working or going to work with childhood obesity using an SFBT-model. Supervisor/trainer/team member between 2000-2004 at Childhood Obesity Unit, Malmo University Hospital. Lecturer in SFBT method at 3 days basic course in childhood obesity 2003, 2005 and 2007. Lecture in SFBT method at SPOC 2004. Lecture in 7th Update on obesity, Brussels 2010. Lecture in Bit’s 1st World Congress of Endocrinology and Metabolism. Xiamen, China. 2011, Lecture in Bit’s 2 nd Annual World Congress of Endobolism. WCE-2012 Beijing, China. Lecture/workshop: Obesity & Weight management. San Francisco 1-3 Dec. 2014, USA.  Bit`s 4th Annual Global Health Conference 2016, Taiwan. Peterson Y. Article: Family treatment. ACTA Paediatrica 2005; 94 (suppl 448): 42-44. Peterson, Y. Väga mig hit och Väga mig dit, ISBN: 978-91-85621–00-2

Abstract:

In 2014 more than 41 million children under the age of 5 years where globally estimated being overweight or obese. Overweight is considered to be a global epidemic and marked increase in childhood obesity is alarming. Preventing the development of obesity in children is therefor a worldwide health priority. Healthcare professionals lack of sufficient knowledge, negative conceptions of families with obesity problems, parents lack of locus of control and professionals –parent relationship at risk sometimes leads to the subject of childhood obesity often is avoided.  The odds for a child to become obese as an adult increase about threefold if one of the parents is obese and rise tenfold with two obese parents. Without a clear goal, it becomes impossible to work successfully with the organization and method development. In a systemic process in which different professions and fields of knowledge interact it can become very helpful for obese children and their families. Attitude, respect for individual´s needs, integrity and influence are very important in any change of life style. It is not enough to use care measures recommended of scientific studies because they also must be useful in practical clinical settings and be useful for the obese patients. There are many barriers in implementation of treatment models and skills in clinical work and prevention of childhood obesity. I will present some ideas/case studies that might get useful.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Richard Windle is an Associate Professor of Health E-learning, co-academic lead of the Health Elearning and Media (HELM) team at the University of Nottingham. Richard is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He moved into the field of e-learning research and development following many years working as a researcher within the field of neuroscience at the Universities of Bristol and London. As well as lecturing within biosciences and leading the curriculum innovation work of HELM, Richard’s research and development work now focuses on multimedia content creation by diverse stakeholder groups within the health arena and on the value and reuse of open educational content. Richard has been the recipient of a range of fellowships, grants and awards for his work in this area.

Abstract:

One of educational conflicts that can arise during experiential learning is the issue of how to assess students in order to ensure that they meet module and academic requirements, whilst at the same time not narrowing the potential learning experience of the student, (Barrett, 2004). We recently introduced an e-portfolio to coordinate all aspects of an international elective placement process for second year nursing students. During their placements students were asked to reflect on their experiences and collate evidence of achievement. After their placement, they developed a portfolio of media to document and reflect upon their learning, aimed at supporting cultural competence development and group learning. Whilst it was straightforward to determine the extent to which the e-portfolio fulfilled institutional assessment and management requirements, we also developed an evaluation tool based on Barret’s (2004) principles of e-portfolio functionality to determine the extent to which the process and subsequent portfolios were able to capture the students’ ownership of their learning around cultural competence and the skills that they can take forward into future practice. Here, we will present our results showing how the process functioned as a robust and reliable assessment of cultural competence and the extent to which students were able to develop a constructivist learning resource that matched the characteristics of a student owned portfolio at the same time.

Speaker
Biography:

Susette Brynard is currently a lecturer in Education Management at the University Free State, South Africa. Previously she was Head of the Department Natural Sciences, Bloemfontein College of Education. She was born in South Africa and graduated at the University Free State to receive a B. Sc.-degree. While lecturing Biology at an Education College she commenced her studies at the University of the Free State, where she received the B Ed (honors) and M Ed Degrees Cum Laude and then her Ph.D.

She received numerous awards during her studies and published papers on the education and development of Down syndrome learners. She is doing ground-breaking work on education opportunities for Down syndrome learners, focusing inter alia on improved educational opportunities through implementing principals of self-advocacy. Her work includes both research about, and advocacy for, such opportunities.

Abstract:

The aim of the article is to provide Down syndrome (DS) learners with better educational opportunities by implementing the principals of self-advocacy, at school level. A literature review was done to obtain background information on the concepts of DS and the self-advocacy program. Qualitative research methods like art-based research combined with a narrative approach was implemented to get information from the participants because they could not always verbalise their feelings. From the findings it can be deduced that some of the principals underlying the self-advocacy movement can be used to enhance the educational opportunities of DS learners. If the principles of self-advocacy could be taught to all DS learners from an early age in schools over a longer period of time, these learners should benefit exponentially. DS learners could then be empowered to make some of their own choices from an early age, taking cognisance of the responsibilities that go with freedom of choice. The contribution this article makes is to apply the ideas of the self-advocacy movement to the education of learners with DS, as a possible way to give these learners a voice. The assumption is that if they can give input regarding their education, it will improve their opportunities to become valued human beings.

Asmait Yohannes

Mount Sinai Department of Surgery-Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA

Title: Nurse executive leadership in ASCs pearl’s
Speaker
Biography:

Asmait Yohannes- RN, BSHM, MPA, CSSM, CLNC

                               Vice chair of Nursing department of surgery

                               Director, Ambulatory Surgery Center

                               Clinical and Operational Director

                               Mount Sinai Hospital/ Department of surgery.

Abstract:

Ambulatory services require more Nurse Executives to oversee operations focus on including items such as unit improvement, cost containment, keeping physicians content, maintaining a high level of satisfaction and quality care for patients and patient’s families. As surgical patient care moves from inpatient to outpatient settings, ASCs Nurse Executive leaders are charged with developing creative solutions to address complex and challenging issues in a most competitive arena. They bring clinical expertise that will allow them to demonstrate a capacity to analyze and synthesize both qualitative and quantitative information in order to reach executive decisions.

Audience take away:-  Operational Excellence/Efficiency

  • Fundamental commitment to patient centered model of care
  • Analyze ASCs Market data
  • Strategic planning
  • Commitment to Quality
  • Become great by consumer Branding

Speaker
Biography:

Mary Brown Assistant Professor of nurse education and a Registered Children’s Nurse. Her particular area of interest within nurse education is international educational development within the nursing curriculum. She is nursing lead for Erasmus and the elective programme within the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Areas of teaching expertise lie within personal and professional effectiveness and cultural competency. Mary is joint lead for the e-portfolio model of teaching and learning for electives within the nursing curriculum. The use of an e-portfolio for module assessment of experimental learning and reflection the system allows students to collect and collate their learning experiences and produce a visible multimedia record of their learning. The e-portfolio gives students the opportunity to develop their personal account of their own understanding of cultural competency and awareness of global healthcare issues. The e-portfolio provides students with a visual collection of their learning that can be taken forward to help towards demonstrating employability

Abstract:

One of educational conflicts that can arise during experiential learning is the issue of how to assess students in order to ensure that they meet module and academic requirements, whilst at the same time not narrowing the potential learning experience of the student, (Barrett, 2004). We recently introduced an e-portfolio to coordinate all aspects of an international elective placement process for second year nursing students. During their placements students were asked to reflect on their experiences and collate evidence of achievement. After their placement, they developed a portfolio of media to document and reflect upon their learning, aimed at supporting cultural competence development and group learning. Whilst it was straightforward to determine the extent to which the e-portfolio fulfilled institutional assessment and management requirements, we also developed an evaluation tool based on Barret’s (2004) principles of e-portfolio functionality to determine the extent to which the process and subsequent portfolios were able to capture the students’ ownership of their learning around cultural competence and the skills that they can take forward into future practice. Here, we will present our results showing how the process functioned as a robust and reliable assessment of cultural competence and the extent to which students were able to develop a constructivist learning resource that matched the characteristics of a student owned portfolio at the same time.

Speaker
Biography:

Lene Bjerregaard has a professional background in nursing and a Master of Science in Soiology, and completed her Ph.D. and Postdoctoral studies at the University Of Southern Denmark. She is now senior Associate Professor (Docent) and research leader at University College Zealand in Denmark (University of applied sciences).

Abstract:

Background: Demographic change, and the increasing number of people in need of help and care are a challenge in the society. Dementia is one of the most common mental illnesses, and not curable. In Germany there are an estimated 1.5 million cases, in Denmark more than 85,000 people suffer from dementia. The prevailing lack of skilled specialists in nursing and care impacts the quality of care being provided and the quality of life of those affected

Aim: The aim of the study is to improve the quality of life for people suffering from dementia and who are residents in nursing care facilities. The project’s overall objective is to establish welfare and health technologies to support people suffering from dementia in maintaining their daily routines.

Methods: Based on cross-border analysis of existing practices, on potential and assumed benefits, and on experiences from three pilot studies, best practice approaches will be developed from the processes of adjusting and further developing innovative technologies targeted residents with dementia. These new approaches will then be applied in the area of further training and result in the establishment of a further training certificate.

Results: The added value will be application of new technologies adjusted, adapted and further developed, based on the users’ needs, routines and processes; and qualified by specialist trained staff in dementia care.

 The project is a part of the EU's INTERREG 5a Programme, and the design include educational as well as Medical Technology Assessment elements. Collaborating partners include private companies aiming to enter new welfare-technological solutions into market.

Partners: University College Sealand(UCSJ), Flensburg University of Applies Sciences (IEMG)(Lead partner), Health Innovation Center Southern Denmark (Colab), Municipality of Aabenraa, “Rise Plejecenter”, Anygroup, LifePartners, Welfare Tech, GesundheitsregionNord, DIAKO-SozialeEinrichtungenGmbH, Pflegenheim “UnterdemRegenbogen” Delta PlegebetriebGmbH.

Speaker
Biography:

Shengyun Li Vice-Director of clinical skill training center of the first affiliated hospital of Zhengzhou University. Chief Superintendent nurse, supervisor of postgraduate students. The member of OR Nursing branch of Chinese Nursing Association. As a visiting scholar went to UBC Univ and Cancer Agency of Canada in 2008. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals

Abstract:

To develop and apply a novel surgical aseptic technique curriculum in specialty training for operating room (OR) nurses. Methods: As surgical environments were improved, related specifications were revised. The proposed surgical aseptic procedure was discussed, improved, and recorded as procedure videos. In the new training program, traditional theoretical lecture training was replaced with sequential theoretical lessons and video demonstration, operation presentation, and skill competition. At the end of the training, the trainees were given questionnaires to assess training outcomes. Differences in student satisfaction regarding the proposed training program and conventional training programs were then compared. Results: A GPA of 3.61 ± 0.58 was recorded after the new training program was implemented. The minimum and maximum average scores of each item were 3.05 ± 0.43 and 4.61 ± 0.33, respectively The satisfaction rate of the trainees in 2013 was significantly higher than that in 2011 (t=2.14, P=0.039).Conclusion: Novel surgical aseptic technique and application in the curriculum design of training for OR nurses should be developed to enhance their mastery of theoretical and practical skills and to modify their behaviors.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Maria Monica Doroteo-Espinosa has completed her Doctor of Education major in Educational Administration at the age of 40 years old from the University of Manila (Pamanatsan ng Lungsod ng Maynila). She is an Assistant Professor at Woosong University, College of Health and Welfare, Department of Nursing. WSU is a specialized university, located in Daejeon, South Korea providing a specialized curriculum based on practical foreign-language and high-tech IT education for every major field of study. She is actively involved in Research and has presented in the following countries: USA, China, Thailand and Philippines. She won the Best Paper Award in the International Conference on Management Science and Management Innovation (MSMI) held in Changsha, China in 2014. She is the author of the book Just Ordinary People from Trials to Triumphs, published by Xlibris publication, Australia. She is currently part of the board of Referees of the Trinitian Researcher, Trinity University of Asia, Philippines.

Abstract:

Lived experiences of nursing students learning an English Context Based-Instruction (CBI) provide greater insight to develop an effective classroom teaching strategy in Nursing education. The main objective of this study was to investigate the Freshmen Korean nursing student’s experiences in the classroom as they learn the Nursing subjects taught in English language. Interview as a method of research was used to explore the views, experiences, beliefs and motivations of individual participants. The researcher extracted the different facets from the 9 students from Woosong University, Department of Nursing who were selected randomply based on their grades. To analyze the data, the method used to code and categorize the interview data were adapted from approaches to qualitative data analysis. Five themes emerged from the interview. The Nursing students stories showed that learning an English Context Based-Instruction (CBI) maybe attained by having the following traits, “readiness to learn”, “hardwork”, “devotion to study amidst difficulty”, “determination to pass the subject”, and “staying focused”. Hence, the significance of this study is both educational and cross-cultural in nature. In conclusion, Nursing students learning an English Context Based-Instruction (CBI) is affected by their readiness to learn and the level of their English comprehension. They experienced some degree of difficulty in understanding the subjects taught in English that leads to anxiety. Furthermore, this study extended the data in the field of second language research in South Korea, as it has implications that directly encroach upon Nursing students’ preparation and readiness for globalization in the Nursing field

Speaker
Biography:

Luo Yang, PhD, professor, doctoral supervisor, has a research and teaching interest in the area of women’s health. She has undertaken more than 20 projects including the National Social Science Found Programme, and other provincial and school-level programmes. She has been awarded the Second Prize of Higher Education Teaching Achievement and granted two national invention patents. She has published more than 100 articles (5 papers in the SCI) and been the chief-editor or editor of 9 textbooks.

Abstract:

This study explored the relationship between nursing students’ critical thinking disposition and their mental self-supporting ability, in order to obtain a profile and determine the psychological predictors of critical thinking. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using convenience sampling from four nursing schools. Findings indicate that there was a positive correlation between these two variables and students’ self-decision, self-cognition, self-confidence, and self-responsibility played a significant role in their critical thinking disposition. Nursing educators should make an effort to improve the students’ critical thinking ability in these four aspects.

Speaker
Biography:

I hold a NRF C3 rating as an established researcher with specialties in Nursing Education, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. For two years in a role (2012 and 2013), I emerged as UNIVEN’s best overall active researcher. I am widely published scholar and reviewer of manuscripts for both national and international journals of high scientific repute. I am currently elected to serve in the International Council of Nurses Rural and Remote Nurses Network Core Steering Committee, which is represented by other eight members from international countries. I have been inducted into Hall of Fame for Research Excellence in Nursing in South Africa by the Forum of University Nursing Deans in South Africa. In 2016, I received a Life Time Achiever award of Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government and Titans: Building Nations

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to obtain the nursing students’ perceptions of clinical learning experiences. Nursing students following the course leading to registration as a nurse general, psychiatric and community) and midwife at the University of Venda constituted the target population. The study used a qualitative descriptive survey to provide insight into the situation. The population was all students studying at the University of Venda and following the four year degree in nursing science. A non-probability purposive sampling was employed to sample 45 participants variably from each level of study. Data was collected from the students through focus group interviews. Participation was voluntary as the study was not interested in obtaining information about a particular clinical setting where learning experiences occur.

Findings indicate that nursing students are aware of the value of the contribution that clinical learning experiences make to their development of professional socialisation. Nursing students regard a patient as the central focus of their clinical learning experiences, they are able to identify those factors which could promote and enhance and those which could hinder or be detrimental to their learning in the clinical setting. However, proper guidance and support from their superiors appears to fall short. There appears to be a need to assist both students and clinical nurse practitioners to increase their understanding with regard to their roles and mutual expectations in the clinical field.

Speaker
Biography:

Salam hadid is R.N. that  has completed her PhD from Haifa University.  lecturers at Zefat academic college, Department of nursing and pain management coordinator nurse at galilee medical center.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND:

Self-assessment in nursing education is a ubiquitous tool for developing independent learners and critical thinkers.  However self-assessment may be influenced by both demographic and perceptual factors, making it far more complex than students or instructors realize.

METHOD:

A demographically heterogeneous group of nursing students (N = 322) was asked to evaluate their performance of a standard clinical procedure - the insertion of a needle into a peripheral vein in an arm simulator – and their assessments were compared with those of an instructor.

RESULTS:

Self-assessment is influenced by gender, age and faith. When student and instructor assessments were compared, a mismatch was found for gender and faith. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between evaluation mismatch and self-efficacy.

CONCLUSION:

Results of self-assessment, commonly considered to be an effective tool for teaching skills in general, and clinical work in particular, may be skewed by both demographic and perceptual factors.

Speaker
Biography:

Phan Thi Dzung have been working at Viet Duc University Hospital for 35 years, 27 years experience in Operating Theater Nurse and 10 years of  ORs  head nurse, 8 years of  Hospital chief nurse. The current, I am working at Education and Training Center. Having completed a Master of Hospital Management programme in 2012 and PhD of  Public Healthat in 2016 at Hanoi University of Public Health (HUPH). I have had several articles published in well-reputed journals such as Vietnamese journals and Nursing Education Today journal, The Thai Journal of Surgecal, British Journal of Nursing and contributed presentations in: scientific conference in Barcelona, Spain in 2011;  Nursing conference on wound care in 2014 in UK; World Congress on Nursing in 2015, Dubai, UAE; American Professional Wound Care Association 2016 Conference in Philadelphia, US.

Abstract:

Vietnam’s nursing competency standards (VNCS) were issued in 2012 and is the important basis on which the continuous nursing training programme are designed and developed. The study aim is to assess the knowledge, wound care competences of nurses at Viet Duc University Hospital before and one year after an educational intervention conducted. This is a comparative descriptive study carried out from 2013 to 2015 at Viet Duc University Hospital. The article is focused on quantitative results, in which scores of knowledge, Capacity in practice among nurses working at seven clinical departments before and one year after the educational intervention. The data collection tools include one 48-knowledge-item self-administered questionnaire, one sixteen-practice-item observation sheet on nurses’ confidence when conducting wound care. Then it  was entered by Epidata version 3.1 and analysed with SPSS version 18.0. The lowest mean score of knowledge on wound are was that of sature removal (8.65 ± 3.19). The proportion of nurses with inadequate competency relating to wound care ranged from 24.8% to 76.7%. Interventional activities have statistically significantly improved nurses' knowledge and competency related to wound care (p<0.001). Before the intervention, the wound care competency of nurses was below average. Wound care program and materials are suitable, feasible and effective. After the intervention, the competency of nurses has noticeably improved. However, it shows that training contents need to be further developed and disseminated to nurses who provide direct wound care for patients in other hospitals to help in proving the quality of patient care as well.

Speaker
Biography:

The author at present is an Assistant Tutor (Assistant Professor) Salalah Nursing Institute,Directorate General for Human Resource Development Ministry of Health Sultanate of Oman. He specializes in Nursing Administration, Leadership and, earned units with his Doctor of Nursing Management from Trinity University of Asia (DNsg.M), and  obtained his Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Leadership and Management (PhD.EM)( Meritissimus)  from St. Jude College Graduate School, Manila. His research inclination is geared towards Nursing Education, Trans-cultural Nursing ,and Leadership and Management. He has participated in Major Nursing Conferences with Accepted papers as Presenter for Oral /Plenary and Poster in the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, Oman, South Africa, United Kingdom, United States & Canada.   He's experience in the service side includes working as an operating room nurse & field researcher. He held post as Assistant Professor II and chaired various committees and cohort groups in his 10 years of teaching.  He received several awards in the academe, practice and teaching.  Recently he was recognized as one of the 10 Most Outstanding Filipino Overseas Worker (TOPES) in the Academe awarded by the Philippine embassy in Muscat. Awarded Best Young Researcher at the 6th World Nursing and Healthcare Conference, in London, United Kingdom 2016.

Abstract:

The research study aimed to identify the degree of learning outcomes of graduated nursing students; learning success is comparatively associated with the passing marks received by the students at the end of the 3 years diploma program. The proponents  identified  the significant contributions of several employed. Non Academic Factors (Age, Gender, Domicile& Type of Secondary School); leading to the success of the students in terms of their marks obtained in their major nursing courses from year one to three having the Final Comprehensive marks and Overall GPA as outcome predictor..  The Proponents utilized Nursing Students who graduated Batch 2011-2015. Sampling Method will utilized a mixed method approach using Consecutive sampling based on criteria on each batch of Salalah Nursing Institute from 2011-2015 N=161  (Identifying those who passed & tracing their previous academic performance and graduated GNP Program ). For this Correlational prospective design the researcher utilized Retrogressive document analysis. Descriptive statistics was performed. The following are the results and findings of the study demographic profile of the respondents shows that majority of the respondents are of female in gender. In terms of domicile it shows that 72.7 % of the student respondents are residing in rural areas and 27.3 % from urban areas. It can be observed that batch 2015 produced less graduates with 19.9 % a big decline from the previous graduates from 2011-2013. In addition the study showed the frequency distribution and percentage of student dropouts and graduates from year 2011-2015. The result implicates the total number of graduates and dropouts from year 2011-2015 with the exemption of year 2014 which is the pioneering year of the foundation program. The perusal of the study indicates that in this year there were 289 students who joined of the Diploma in Nursing, 161 of which successfully passed with the percentage of 55.7% and a 128 total number of dropouts 44.3% from batch 2011-2015. Batch 2013 yielded the highest percentage of successful completion at 64.70% while Batch 2015 got the highest number of dropouts at 61.5%. It can be observed that there is a notable fluctuation of successful completion from year 2011 to 2015. Thus an observed decline of graduates from batch 2015 shows thirty two (32) 38.5 % which has the largest entry students in the span of five years eighty three (83).  Parametric test on correlation of factors age and Overall GPA using Pearson R , the Test results shows  significant relation between Age and Overall GPA  using the decision criteria on the p value <0.01. The Scrutiny of the statistical result using Pearsons R suggests correlation between type of Secondary School and Overall GPA. Using the decision criteria of a p value <0.01. Results indicate relationship between type of secondary school and overall GPA. The review of the statistical results using Kendall's tau_b and Spearman's rho shows correlation between GPA per year of GNP is significant. Result expresses that year two GPA among any other year predicts and correlates strongly with the Overall GPA, Year 2 performance significantly affects the outcomes of student learning as to the rate and marks they get overall after finishing the General Nursing Program.  In conclusion the results of the study shows that majority of the students based the demographic profile are female, single, residing in rural areas and took secondary school in a government run institution. The study showed that the factors such as age, marital status, domicile type of secondary school and year1 to 3 general point averages are factors contributing to the overall learning success. In this study the researcher concludes that the identified large number of dropouts was found among batch 2015.

 

  • Nursing Practice

Session Introduction

Lorraine Shields

California Baptist University College of Nursing, USA

Title: Development of an evidence-based neonatal discharge pathway based on the principles of family-centered care
Speaker
Biography:

Lorraine Shields has completed her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Vanderbilt School of Nursing, Nashville Tennessee.  She has 36 years in Neonatal Nursing as a bedside nurse, transport nurse, Clinical Nurse Specialist, and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner.  She has served many positions in the National Association of Neonatal Nurses.  She is currently Assistant Professor of Nursing in the graduate program at College of Nursing at California Baptist University

Abstract:

Objective: Present the development of an evidence-based neonatal discharge pathway based on the core principles of family-centered care designed to increase parent participation in care and to improve parent readiness and confidence in assuming full care of their high-risk neonate.

 

Background/Significance: Despite the abundance of evidence supporting family-centered care and a comprehensive discharge teaching process for the NICU, implementation of family-centered care practices continues to be a challenge and inconsistencies in discharge teaching processes persist. A neonatal discharge pathway with specific teaching transition points provides a more comprehensive discharge process, integrates the principles of family-centered care into all care practices, enhances the partnership between the nurse and the family, and ensures parents are involved early and throughout their infant’s NICU journey.

 

Presentation includes:

  1. The scientific development of an evidence-based discharge teaching pathway by

       use of the European Pathway Association’s eight step method for pathway

       development. The discharge pathway includes transition points for teaching and

       teaching topics.

  1. The integration of Peplau’s Theory of Interpersonal Relations which emphasizes the

partnership between the nurse and the family.

  1. Families desire to participate and reasons for their hesitancy to participate in care. Appropriate interventions to address these issues are presented.
  2. Presentation of a family-friendly bedside poster which enables the family and all staff

to view and track infant and family progress and readiness toward discharge.

5.  A plan for implementation of the discharge pathway (parent and staff education).

6.  A highlight of nursing’s vital contribution to the development of evidenced-based        

     practice and to the improvement in patient and family outcomes.

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her PhD at the age of  31 years from Erciyes University.  She  is a research assistant at Selcuk University, Faculty of Health Science and has national and international publications.

Abstract:

Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of motivational interviewing on self-efficiency, metabolic control and health behavioral change during a 12-month period after the motivational interviewing support administered to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Design: Randomized controlled trial

Material and Method: After the intervention (the sixth month), at the end of the one-year period, researchers were able to reach 32 patients from  the study group. The study group was divided into experimental and control groups. After  the  intervention, no other intervention was administered to both control and  intervention groups. The participants received their usual care. Participants in the experimental and control groups were interviewed on the telephone at the eighteenth month after the intervention, and  their self-efficiency, metabolic control and health behaviors were evaluated. For data analysis, this study used the t test in independent samples for variables with a normal distribution, and the Mann-Whitney U test and the Friedman test for variables without a normal distribution. The chi-square test was used to compare categorical variables, and p<0.05 was the threshold for statistical significance.

Results: The mean age of participants in the experimental group was 51.83±7.42 years. Of them, 72.2% were female, 55.6% had primary school or less education, and 77.8% had experienced  type 2 DM disease for  more than 5 years. The mean age of participants in the control group was 53.78±6.65 years. Of them 64.3% were female, 57.1% had primary school or less education, and 57.1% had experienced  type 2 DM disease for  more than 5 years. The difference of the total self-efficiency, sub-scale scores and metabolic values of the experimental group between follow-ups was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05). Apart from metabolic values between follow-ups of the control group (preprandial blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, HbA1c, weight, BMI, waist circumference), the total self-efficiency and sub-scale scores were statistically significant (p<0.05). Inter-group comparisons determined that the difference between the sixth and eighteenth months was statistically significant in terms of self-efficiency (except for the medical treatment sub-scale score) and metabolic values (except for postprandial blood glucose and waist circumference) (p<0.05). The eighteenth month follow-up indicated that the groups were similar in terms of medication, nutrition and physical activity (p>0.05).

Conclusion: This study determined that not continuing to provide motivational interviewing based on transtheoretical model administered  to people with Type 2 DM after the intervention  has a negative effect on self-efficiency levels, metabolic control and health behavioral change. Thus, it is recommended that motivational interviewing based on the transtheoretical model should be periodically conducted considering patients' characteristics.

Speaker
Biography:

J-D Wagner has graduated from the University of South Africa (UNISA) in 2013 with a Master’s degree in Health Studies. He has functioned in both the public and private health sectors in South Africa, in the clinical nursing domain and is currently a Lecturer at the University of the Western Cape (Cape Town, South Africa)

Abstract:

Introduction: Communication is an essential element to the success of health service organisations and therefore it needs to assess its communication systems, (by means of communication audits), from time to time. This study highlighted areas of effective and ineffective communication, as well as areas of communication satisfaction and dissatisfaction, among professional nurses.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe communication effectiveness and communication satisfaction experienced by professional nurses in selected public health services.

Research design: Quantitative, explorative and descriptive research was conducted. The Downs and Adrian (2004) structured questionnaire was adapted to collect the data. The study population consisted of three groups of professional nurses, namely nurse Managers, operational managers and professional nurses in three selected public hospitals.

Results: The findings revealed that although professional nurses are satisfied with their supervisor-subordinate communication, they are dissatisfied with personal feedback between all categories of professional nurses.

Recommendations: for the improvement of the communication effectiveness and communication satisfaction of professional nurses are aimed at creating an organisational atmosphere conducive to two-way communication.

Speaker
Biography:

Fatma Refaat Abd El-Fattah Ahmed has completed her Msc at the age of 27 and Ph.D. at the age of 30 years from Alexandria University. She is a lecturer of Critical Care & Emergency Nursing department, Faculty of Nursing-Alexandria University. She is certified by European Resuscitation Council by 2014 for Advanced Life Support (valid to 2017) and European Trauma Course (valid to 2019). She has participated in more than 11 national and international conferences. She has published more than 2 papers in reputed journals. She has been serving in preparing more than 5 editions of Critical Care Nursing & Emergency Care Manual.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Critically ill patients are greatly suffering. They are at a vulnerable period of their lives. Becoming a patient in the intensive care unit represents a considerable crisis which increase the like hood to ICU acquired complications such as impaired physical, cognitive and mental well-being. Therefore, it is essential to start rehabilitation while patients are still in ICU, with the emphasis on prevention, early treatment & information-giving to patients and their families. Rehabilitation nursing begins with immediate preventive care in the first stage of illness. It is continued through the restorative stage of care & involves adaptation of the whole being to new life to reduce the burden of illness, injury and disability and to improve health and functional status. . The purpose of this study is to identify barriers to the provision of early and sustained rehabilitation within ICUs. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation:  Two tools were used for data collection.  Tool one titled "Barriers of early/sustained rehabilitation structured questionnaire". Tool two titled "Self-report of the rehabilitation practices for critically ill patients. Findings:  Institution related barriers constitute the highest percentage that hinders the early rehabilitation in ICUs. However, more than three-quarters of the studied critical care nurses practice respiratory rehabilitation (80%) in the form of airway management and respiratory exercise regimen. Conclusion & Significance: Institution, health care providers related barriers are among the barriers that hinder the implementation of structured rehabilitation programs in the critically ill patients. Recommendations are made for developing models to predict adverse events in specific intensive care units acquired impairments and designing rehabilitation service, programs and protocols in intensive care units.

  • Healthcare

Session Introduction

Cherie P. Erkmen

Temple University Health Systems, USA

Title: Clinical pathway for esophagectomy improves perioperative nutrition
Speaker
Biography:

Cherie P. Erkmen, MD attended the UCLA School of Medicine and Brigham & Women’s Hospital for general surgery residency and cardiothoracic fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor at Temple University Medical School. 

Abstract:

Introduction: Clinical pathways have been shown to shorten hospitalization and decrease costs in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. We describe the methodology of creating an esophagectomy pathway and analyze its implementation and effects on outcomes and costs.

Methods: We documented the process of developing an esophagectomy clinical pathway.  We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 12 patients before pathway implementation and 12 patients after.

Results: Pathway Implementation: More patients had a pre-operative anesthesia consult (11 vs. 0; p<0.0001), were presented at tumor board (9 pathway vs. 2 pre-pathway; p=0.012), and chose their postoperative care facility before surgery (8 vs. 0; p=0.0013) Outcomes: There were no changes in mortality (0 vs. 0), major complications (5 vs. 5), hospitalization period (median 9.5 vs. 12 days; p=0.82), and total costs charges ($98395 vs. $96946; p=0.96). However, pathway patients lost significantly less weight preoperatively (2.3% vs. 7.6%; p=0.012) and perioperatively (6.3% vs. 12%; p=0.021).

Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the process of designing, implementing, and measuring clinical and financial outcomes of an esophagectomy pathway. While there was no significant decrease in mortality, complications, hospitalization, or charges, our pathway significantly decreased pre- and perioperative weight loss. We attribute this improvement in clinical outcome to coordinated patient education and care.  

Speaker
Biography:

Julie Pullen holds a DNP from Concordia University Wisconsin, a Master’s of Science in Nursing and Counseling Psychology.  She practiced full-time as a Family Nurse Practitioner before completing a post-master’s certification in geriatrics.  She is a certified geriatric nurse practitioner.  Her doctoral project, focusing on suicide prevention in long-term care, was published in a geriatric journal.  She currently serves on a community suicide prevention coalition and educates Montana State University faculty, staff, and students in suicide prevention gatekeeper training.

Abstract:

Gatekeeper training remains fundamental to broad suicide prevention strategies on international, national, and state levels within the U.S.  Among articles reviewed, gatekeeper training was found, with few exception, to be both beneficial and feasible to varying degrees.   This study describes outcomes of gatekeeper training implemented in a community located in a rural northwestern state ranking among the highest for suicide. The aim of this multi-method study was twofold: Examine outcomes of an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer adopted by one community at-large, and develop recommendations guiding future population-based interventions for the area.   Data were collected utilizing pre- post-survey questionnaires administered from January, 2013 through September, 2016. Participants were from churches, social services, public health, mental health, a suicide prevention conference, a school, college, and a university (n = 897).  The quantitative results were statistically significant (p < 0.0001).  The most significant improvements from pre- to post-training were how to ask about suicide, how to persuade the person to receive help, and information about local resources.  From the qualitative data, two main themes consistent across cohorts that emerged were ‘appreciation’ and ‘desire’ or ‘need’ to learn more. Overall, results were consistent with other studies suggesting that a public health approach to suicide prevention shows promise in terms of increasing awareness and perceived knowledge and ability to intervene.  Findings may be relevant to other rural communities where access to mental health services are limited, however it remains unclear if gatekeeper training impacts suicide rates.

Speaker
Biography:

Fredricka Gilje holds a PhD, Master’s degree, and Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. She has 40 years of experience as a nurse educator in baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in North Dakota, Montana, Washington and Alaska. In addition she engages in international collaboration in nursing research in Norway and Sweden. She has authored and co-authored various publications in nursing journals and books, including articles concerning caring for suicidal persons. She is a board member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-Montana Chapter and serves on a local suicide prevention coalition in a state located in northwestern U.S.A.

Abstract:

Gatekeeper training remains fundamental to broad suicide prevention strategies on international, national, and state levels within the U.S.  Among articles reviewed, gatekeeper training was found, with few exception, to be both beneficial and feasible to varying degrees.   This study describes outcomes of gatekeeper training implemented in a community located in a rural northwestern state ranking among the highest for suicide. The aim of this multi-method study was twofold: Examine outcomes of an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer adopted by one community at-large, and develop recommendations guiding future population-based interventions for the area.   Data were collected utilizing pre- post-survey questionnaires administered from January, 2013 through September, 2016. Participants were from churches, social services, public health, mental health, a suicide prevention conference, a school, college, and a university (n = 897).  The quantitative results were statistically significant (p < 0.0001).  The most significant improvements from pre- to post-training were how to ask about suicide, how to persuade the person to receive help, and information about local resources.  From the qualitative data, two main themes consistent across cohorts that emerged were ‘appreciation’ and ‘desire’ or ‘need’ to learn more. Overall, results were consistent with other studies suggesting that a public health approach to suicide prevention shows promise in terms of increasing awareness and perceived knowledge and ability to intervene.  Findings may be relevant to other rural communities where access to mental health services are limited, however it remains unclear if gatekeeper training impacts suicide rates.

Speaker
Biography:

Eric Loftsgaarden has an MBA from the University of Montana (1997) and has completed the Master’s degree program in Statistics from Montana State University and is continuing in the Statistic PhD program.  Prior to returning to school he was the Director of the Analytics and Data Warehousing Practice at a public consulting company and directly responsible for implementing systems, best practices and training programs data analysis at over 30 companies including 8 fortune 1000 companies.

Abstract:

Gatekeeper training remains fundamental to broad suicide prevention strategies on international, national, and state levels within the U.S.  Among articles reviewed, gatekeeper training was found, with few exception, to be both beneficial and feasible to varying degrees.   This study describes outcomes of gatekeeper training implemented in a community located in a rural northwestern state ranking among the highest for suicide. The aim of this multi-method study was twofold: Examine outcomes of an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer adopted by one community at-large, and develop recommendations guiding future population-based interventions for the area.   Data were collected utilizing pre- post-survey questionnaires administered from January, 2013 through September, 2016. Participants were from churches, social services, public health, mental health, a suicide prevention conference, a school, college, and a university (n = 897).  The quantitative results were statistically significant (p < 0.0001).  The most significant improvements from pre- to post-training were how to ask about suicide, how to persuade the person to receive help, and information about local resources.  From the qualitative data, two main themes consistent across cohorts that emerged were ‘appreciation’ and ‘desire’ or ‘need’ to learn more. Overall, results were consistent with other studies suggesting that a public health approach to suicide prevention shows promise in terms of increasing awareness and perceived knowledge and ability to intervene.  Findings may be relevant to other rural communities where access to mental health services are limited, however it remains unclear if gatekeeper training impacts suicide rates.        

Speaker
Biography:

Nathaniel Stahley holds a BS in Business Management and currently is Grant Coordinator for a community-based project developing systems for trauma response and education.  Nathaniel is passionate about mental health, and over the past eight years he has worked in social service and public heath sectors.  The last three years, he has chaired the Suicide Prevention Coalition of Yellowstone Valley, a local group of volunteers and professionals working for collective impact. He is a certified instructor in Youth Mental Health First Aid and Question Persuade Refer (QPR); both best practice trainings for suicide prevention

Abstract:

Gatekeeper training remains fundamental to broad suicide prevention strategies on international, national, and state levels within the U.S.  Among articles reviewed, gatekeeper training was found, with few exception, to be both beneficial and feasible to varying degrees.   This study describes outcomes of gatekeeper training implemented in a community located in a rural northwestern state ranking among the highest for suicide. The aim of this multi-method study was twofold: Examine outcomes of an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer adopted by one community at-large, and develop recommendations guiding future population-based interventions for the area.   Data were collected utilizing pre- post-survey questionnaires administered from January, 2013 through September, 2016. Participants were from churches, social services, public health, mental health, a suicide prevention conference, a school, college, and a university (n = 897).  The quantitative results were statistically significant (p < 0.0001).  The most significant improvements from pre- to post-training were how to ask about suicide, how to persuade the person to receive help, and information about local resources.  From the qualitative data, two main themes consistent across cohorts that emerged were ‘appreciation’ and ‘desire’ or ‘need’ to learn more. Overall, results were consistent with other studies suggesting that a public health approach to suicide prevention shows promise in terms of increasing awareness and perceived knowledge and ability to intervene.  Findings may be relevant to other rural communities where access to mental health services are limited, however it remains unclear if gatekeeper training impacts suicide rates.  

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Zineldin´s  main interest in Health, Medicine, healthcare quality and patient safety, leadership emotions, organizational psychology. He has PhD in BA , two different masters in psychology and  Psychiatry, Medical and Public Health studies. Has taught the Stockholm University for many years and engaged in a considerable number of research and consulting activities. He has published several books and numerous articles in many different international journals. He has been a Member of different editorial boards of different journals and the Guest Editor of the International Journal of Health Care Quality and others. Some of the articles have been cited with the highest quality ratings. He is  Editor in Chief  different journals such as International Journal of Work Organization and Emotions, former guest editor of  International journal of Healthcare Quality Assurance

Abstract:

It’s well known that nursery is an important component of the health care delivery system. Any drop in the quality of nursing will lead to impairment in health care quality.

The communication and integration period between the patient and the nurse is much longer than the communication and integration with the treating physician. The instruction regarding the medical process, critics of medicine and postoperative care is mostly a nursing activity.

The public health nurse deals with a large segment of the society, they represent the major work force in primary health care, material and child health centre, and well-baby clinic. They supervise and deliver a large number of nursing activities including the health and nutrition education of the recipients.

With the expansion of the health care delivery in some countries, there is an urgent need to upgrade the capabilities of the nursing staff. A newly graduated nurse will gain experience through an infrastructure practicing in a hospital or health centre. However this would never upgrade the knowledge especially with the new and recent development in nursing techniques and methodologies.

The public health nurse who is in continues contact with mother and children in health care delivery centres require special atmosphere and attention as they are dealing with a large segment of the population. Training program offered to those nurses are quite limited and there is an evident need to train them in subjects related to the quality of the object-Q1 (medical treatment itself), quality of process-Q2 (how the treatment is conducing), quality of infrastructure (Q3), quality of communication (Q4) and quality of atmosphere (Q5).

The main objective of the paper is to ensure that the healthcare nurse have the needed qualifications and elements to assure high quality care and patient safety. The 5 qualities model includes tools and techniques in all aspects related to the daily activities practiced in primary healthcare. The paper will propose news techniques and methodologies with intention to upgrade the quality of performance of the public health nurse is the institutions providing health care which will be ultimately reflected on the health status of the recipients of the health services.

Speaker
Biography:

Aissatou Fall is a medical epidemiologist and researcher. She graduated in medicine from the Faculty of Medecine in Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast. In addition, she earned a Master's degree in field epidemiology at University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, France. She completed a PhD thesis in public health, epidemiology option, at Université de Montréal (graduated 2013). She worked as a research officer on various public health projects in Québec, Canada

Abstract:

The objective of our study was to describe the exposure to psychosocial work demands and to evaluate the association between psychosocial work demands ("high-strain" or "Iso-strain" jobs) and major depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥23) among working pregnant women in Montréal, Québec (N=3 765). In total, 24.4% of pregnant women were exposed to "high-strain" jobs (high demand and low control) and the proportion of workers exposed to "Iso-strain" was 69.1% ("high-strain" job with low support at work).

At 24 to 26 weeks of pregnancy, prevalence of major depressive symptoms was 9.8% (95% CI: 8.7–10.8%) for all pregnant women. In our sample, 14.7% (95% CI: 12.5–17.2%) of pregnant women who had been exposed to "high-strain" jobs and 17.0% (95% CI: 14.1–20.2%) of women who had been exposed to "Iso-strain" presented major depressive symptoms. Psychosocial work demands were associated with the mental health of pregnant women, when other organizational and personal factors which they encountered outside the work settings were taken into account. The impact of the "demand-control-support" model and the critical role of social support at work have been demonstrated among working pregnant women.

Despite the application of preventive measures during pregnancy, screening and intervention measures should be implemented in workplaces to reduce the prevalence of prenatal mental health problems and exposure to psychosocial work demands so as to prevent maternal and neonatal complications.

Speaker
Biography:

Zuoyan Liu has completed her Master degree from Nursing school of Sichuan University, Sichuan, China. She is the deputy head nurse of West China hospital of Sichuan University, and in the Department for rehabilitation Medical center. She has published more than 20 paper in reputed journals and has participated in compiled seven books, and been responsible for compiled one book. She has host three projects as the team leader. At the same time, she is the member of rehabilitation nursing care professional committee of Sichuan nursing association. She is be occupied in the clinical teaching, scientific research and management work.

Abstract:

Background: Because of the hospitalization expense and the state requirement of average length of stay, the rehabilitation of patients with stroke is always implemented at home.

Objective: To assess the comprehensive condition of home-based rehabilitation including physical, psychological and social situation after stroke in China.

Method: This study selected 234 discharged patients from a grade A tertiary hospital rehabilitation medical center using the convenience sampling method. A set of questionnaires were used to measure in the outpatient follow-up, family follow-up and telephone follow-up survey.

Results: The comprehensive effect of home-based rehabilitation after stroke in China is poor. Nearly 40% of stroke patients’ daily life self-care ability was moderate to full dependence and nearly half (50.24%) of the patients had moderate or severe sense of burden. In respect of patients' social support, 59.40% of caregivers said they had a medium/heavy burden. Moreover, the rehabilitation effects of patients’physiology, psychology and social support would interact with each other. There is a positive correlation in Barthel index scores and IADL scores and mobile ability score, a positive correlation between IADL scores and mobile ability score, a positive correlation between depression level and self-perceived burden scale score, but a negative correlation in Barthel index score, IADL scores, mobile ability score and caregivers’ self-perceived burden scale score.

Conclusion: The effect of home-based rehabilitation with stroke patients is poor and the conditions of physiology, psychology and social support of patients would interact with each other. Thus it is important to explore efficient home-based rehabilitation programs after stroke.